Hot answers tagged

35

Yes. Their names, logos, and body designs are all trademarked and cannot be used in any capacity outside those explicitly allowed by trademark law, which almost certainly excluded use in your game. And expect to be completely incapable of acquiring those licenses for reasonable terms, as the licenses are generally very expensive and come with a mile long ...


28

On each object you will choose one or more faces that will be removed. In between these faces will be your connection. Select both objects in object mode. Press Ctrl+J to join the objects into one. Then enter edit mode and change to face manipulation mode. Remove the faces that will be joined. Select them and press X, remember to delete faces, not vertices....


18

Game characters are usually animated using a technique called skeletal animation: (Image source: Valve Software) Each 3d model has an invisible bone structure (the red and teal lines in the image above). Each polygon of the model is connected to a bone. When you define a motion sequence, you define it as a sequence of rotations of the bones around their ...


17

As some one who ventured a bit into the creation of art, I would really advise you to get in touch with one rather than just "buying" models. Art from different sources rarely work together (unless of course, they are meant to be) and high quality models alone won't make good graphics, everything needs to be put together with a sense of aesthetics to really ...


13

TL;DR In short.. Get Blender! Since you're a beginner it's not worth pouring k's into a software you have no idea how to fully utilize. Simplicity explained Well, simplicity is a relative term. For one Blender will be simple, for the other guy Maya. But in the end it depends on how much you use the tool. For example, if you start with Blender, as time ...


11

I believe you want hardware instancing. http://xbox.create.msdn.com/en-US/education/catalog/sample/mesh_instancing


11

This is not legal advice because I am not a lawyer, you should consider talking to a real lawyer if you want a proper answer to any law-related topic. You can't use the assets that ship with Minecraft. You can, however, create your own box-man avatar, and that would probably be a much better idea for a variety of reasons even disregarding the legal or ...


11

It depends on the contractual agreement you have with your client. If they own all source art assets you create, then the safe answer is "no".


10

Every "UV seam" in your model - that is, every place where the model's faces are continuous while the UV map for the same edge is cut up - is a problem both for the artists and for the hardware. It makes it harder to texture the model properly. This is especially true when the editing is done on the texture directly, in 2D, not in a 3D painting program. The ...


10

In doing a similar project, I found the SketchUp modeling program to be excellent for copying existing architecture. That's what Google originally meant it for after all. Here's an account of how I did this: Outsides SketchUp's Photo Match feature (tutorial video) is an absolute killer. It lets you to do this: Load in a photograph of the real building ...


10

Non commercial ...refers to an activity or entity that does not in some sense involve commerce. Selling the game involves commerce. Yes, companies are allowed to do that, the details of that aren't on topic here. You may want to look into a paid version of the software, which likely doesn't have the same restrictions. Alternatively, use a different tool ...


9

Assimp seems to be a good choice and I will be testing this with my next project. It supports a huge array of formats including supporting bones and animations. Not just for model loading, but for changing from format to format, computing vertex and face normals, splitting meshes, and triangulating polygons. It is available under the BSD license.


9

I created a basic FPS a while ago and got to the point of creating weapon models too. What you will want to do is to create a 'world model' which is the model actually seen on the character in the game, and a 'view model' which is a high detail model that only the player sees. These Viewmodels should be aligned to the camera during creation, so you know ...


9

You can play a lot of tricks with space using portals (the rendering kind) - see Prey, Portal, or Antichamber, for examples. In case you're not familiar with this concept, it's much more than simply teleporting the player around - the renderer actually lets you see through the portal, so it can be completely invisible if that's what you want. Antichamber ...


8

I think you can do this just by examining the index list. For each occurrence of each edge in the index list (an edge should never appear more than twice, and exactly twice for a closed model): If the indices that define the edge appear in the same order more than once, then you've find a winding order disagreement. 0---1 | /| | / | |/ | 3---2 This ...


8

Even with a manual process of model generation, there are some tricks you can use to maximize your output. We can follow the same basic rules for real life conservation. The three R's: Reuse - Take the same model and apply a different texture to it. This can save you the time it takes to generate a model. And will give a convincing "that's a different ...


8

What you are looking for is called a mesh simplification/decimation algorithm. There are several of them out there, you'd just have to implement the one you choose in C# if no C# implementation exists. Here are a few that Google turned up: Triangulated Surface Mesh Simplification Mesh Simplification Computing with Geometry slides Mesh Simplification ...


7

Colleague of mine was looking for a freelance 3d-artists lately, I've got to participate a bit. From what I gathered, there are a lot of nuances strictly defining the final price, but basically, it's all stands on time-per-feature basis. I will briefly describe a process from a layman's point of view, corrections are welcome. Also prices in this post are ...


7

XNA ContentManager can parse ".x" and ".fbx" files. More information can be found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb197848.aspx


7

You can always use oDesk or eLance. The former offers per-hour jobs, the latter offers fixed-price jobs. I've used them before, oDesk for art assets. You just need to be picky and not pay more than X hours a week; but it can backfire. I recommend eLance, therefore.


7

As always, it depends. Game art is a very deep field, so in my opinion you should find a well rounded artist partner to help you, instead of hiring people to do do specific jobs. Regarding 2D vs 3D, in fact, as Quacks says, creating a 3D model is much more complex than creating a 2D drawing, and therefore more expensive. However, animating in 2D is ...


7

You make a single soldier model. You make a number of weapons. Then you would use something oft called a "hard point" (or "attach point" or many other things). You set such a point on the model's hand. You set another such point on the gun's grip. Now you can programmatically look up these points in the model data and mount the gun's grip in the soldier'...


7

When you're reading the model into your game, you'll be iterating through each vertex of the model. Simply keep track of the max/min for each X, Y and Z axes. Using these values you can find the center of your model as well as the extents. The width is the distance between X min and X max, the depth and height are similarly calculated depending on which axis ...


6

The build-in physics engine assumes 1 BU (Blender Unit) = 1 meter. However, you can use whatever you like, and since Blender 2.5 you can also set an explicit conversion to real-world units (properties editor -> scene tab -> units panel). Keep in mind what kind of values your game engine expects, too - most exporters can re-scale the model during the export (...


6

Two big reasons are making sense of the unwrapped texture and edge artifacts. As you mentioned, it can be very difficult for an artist to make sense of how their 2D edits will wrap around the 3D model if the seams don't make sense. In the case where every face was separated and optimally placed with some kind of bin packing algorithm, it would be nearly ...


6

In Blender 2.5 and later, select the face or edge you want to measure in Edit Mode, and turn on the Properties shelf by pressing 'N'. In here, scroll to Mesh Display > Numerics. You can select to display the edge length and the face area of the faces. To get the size of an entire object, the Properties shelf in Object Mode will list the X, Y and Z ...


6

I can picture three common routes for creating a photo-realistic texture. Either: You're a talented artist who can paint photo-realism and has no problem making it from scratch. You use a camera to take a photo of a surface that looks similar to what you need. You have enough artistic skills to start from a photo and modify it. But that's concerning ...


6

Turns out this was an issue with my perspective, I was able to solve my problem by setting the gluPerspective correctly: void C_MediaLoader::display(void) { glLoadIdentity(); gluPerspective(45, 640/480, 1.0, 1000.0); /* Znear and Zfar */ // remainder code is the same as before... } Thanks for everyone's help!


6

If we assume that most face normals are correct, then you can query the surrounding face normals and dot them with the current face. If the dot product is negative, the normal is facing the wrong way. You may have to add some heuristics in there where (this is just an e.g.) if 4 of the 5 surrounding face normals are facing one way (their dot product is ...


6

You need to modify your model so that the UV (texture) coordinates place the texture at the correct location. It's possible that setting the texture address mode to clamp may (sort-of) solve your issue. But this also depends on your model having the correct UV coordinates to make it work. GraphicsDevice.SamplerStates[0] = SamplerState.LinearClamp; (The ...


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