Hot answers tagged

31

On each object you will choose one or more faces that will be removed. In between these faces will be your connection. Select both objects in object mode. Press Ctrl+J to join the objects into one. Then enter edit mode and change to face manipulation mode. Remove the faces that will be joined. Select them and press X, remember to delete faces, not vertices....


18

Game characters are usually animated using a technique called skeletal animation: (Image source: Valve Software) Each 3d model has an invisible bone structure (the red and teal lines in the image above). Each polygon of the model is connected to a bone. When you define a motion sequence, you define it as a sequence of rotations of the bones around their ...


12

In doing a similar project, I found the SketchUp modeling program to be excellent for copying existing architecture. That's what Google originally meant it for after all. Here's an account of how I did this: Outsides SketchUp's Photo Match feature (tutorial video) is an absolute killer. It lets you to do this: Load in a photograph of the real building ...


11

It depends on the contractual agreement you have with your client. If they own all source art assets you create, then the safe answer is "no".


10

Non commercial ...refers to an activity or entity that does not in some sense involve commerce. Selling the game involves commerce. Yes, companies are allowed to do that, the details of that aren't on topic here. You may want to look into a paid version of the software, which likely doesn't have the same restrictions. Alternatively, use a different tool ...


9

You can play a lot of tricks with space using portals (the rendering kind) - see Prey, Portal, or Antichamber, for examples. In case you're not familiar with this concept, it's much more than simply teleporting the player around - the renderer actually lets you see through the portal, so it can be completely invisible if that's what you want. Antichamber ...


8

Even with a manual process of model generation, there are some tricks you can use to maximize your output. We can follow the same basic rules for real life conservation. The three R's: Reuse - Take the same model and apply a different texture to it. This can save you the time it takes to generate a model. And will give a convincing "that's a different ...


8

What you are looking for is called a mesh simplification/decimation algorithm. There are several of them out there, you'd just have to implement the one you choose in C# if no C# implementation exists. Here are a few that Google turned up: Triangulated Surface Mesh Simplification Mesh Simplification Computing with Geometry slides Mesh Simplification ...


8

As always, it depends. Game art is a very deep field, so in my opinion you should find a well rounded artist partner to help you, instead of hiring people to do do specific jobs. Regarding 2D vs 3D, in fact, as Quacks says, creating a 3D model is much more complex than creating a 2D drawing, and therefore more expensive. However, animating in 2D is ...


7

You make a single soldier model. You make a number of weapons. Then you would use something oft called a "hard point" (or "attach point" or many other things). You set such a point on the model's hand. You set another such point on the gun's grip. Now you can programmatically look up these points in the model data and mount the gun's grip in the soldier'...


6

You need to modify your model so that the UV (texture) coordinates place the texture at the correct location. It's possible that setting the texture address mode to clamp may (sort-of) solve your issue. But this also depends on your model having the correct UV coordinates to make it work. GraphicsDevice.SamplerStates[0] = SamplerState.LinearClamp; (The ...


6

You can first decimate the mesh. Then use the decimated mesh to create a triangle mesh shape to create a collision mesh for that model. You will probably run into issues with automatically generating meshes in this way. Since your physics object will not exactly match your world object. The decimating can have unexpected results for changing the shapes of ...


6

When you're reading the model into your game, you'll be iterating through each vertex of the model. Simply keep track of the max/min for each X, Y and Z axes. Using these values you can find the center of your model as well as the extents. The width is the distance between X min and X max, the depth and height are similarly calculated depending on which axis ...


5

There is no single "best" 3D Modelling software. But being a hobbyist, and a complete newbie: I'd go with Blender You have tons of resources, and it's completely free, in both senses. It's also multiplatform, so you can easily use it if you use GNU/Linux or Mac OS X. It has it's own 3D game engine, and you can script it with Python, it's probably the best ...


5

As @Sean suggests, trying to go with real branding can be a nightmare, and is unlikely to serve you well. An alternative is to use fairly true-to-life models, but omit any branding and use your own alternative names for the vehicles. A good example of this is the Grand Theft Auto series, in which the vehicles are modelled on actual "real-world" vehicles, ...


5

After digging down into the material settings I found the "Ambient" setting under "Shading" was set to 1.0. I changed it to 0.0 and it seemed to fix the problem.


5

If you want to rotate an object around.Center must be at the point(0,0,0) To achieve that simply Translate the object to point(0,0,0) Rotate and Translate back example: Translate(0,0,-1) Rotate(90) Translate(0,0,1)


5

The problem you are describing could be caused by polygons with more than 4 vertices. Please make sure that you have edges in the model as seen in the image below:


5

A quick Google search reveals this question over on the Unity forums, the steps provided there are as follows: Sketchup Standard version or Pro Version - v8 or higher: 1 Create/open the model with Google Sketchup 2 Align the faces of the model (In the Monochrome mode--> the bright side should be up/front) 3 Export in .dae format (Default settings!) ...


5

Loose fitting, fast Generate a bounding AABB, which you likely already have (and is super cheap to compute for a sphere). Project the AABB's corners to the screen. Take the maximum and minimum X and Y values of the projected coordinates to form bounds of screen-space rectangle. This will be at least as large as the object. Depending on camera ...


4

OpenGameArt.org is a place where free and open source assets are collected and distributed: http://opengameart.org/


4

Yes, you should actually be able to do this within Blender using a Python scripting. There are plenty of functions available for modifying meshes. You should be able to follow the tutorial you provided, converting the methods into Python and adapting them to modify a mesh of your choosing. Alternatively, you could write a application in your language of ...


4

You'll need to position the weapon in the player's local space, and apply the same transformation to it that you apply to the player model. More specifically, figure out the vector from the player's origin to the weapon's origin, before applying any rotation. In your case it seems this may be (2, 0, -2) or some such. Then rotate that vector by the player'...


4

The pros of using animated sprites are: Ease of use: simply switch each frame to animate a sprite. There are already many tools developed for generating sprite sheets and animating them, many of them available from the Unity Asset Store. Doing so opens up a huge amount of productivity for a simple game. Easy collision detection: Since each sprite is defined ...


4

It's possible, but not practical. There's no reason to model the inner workings of a car in game. If you want to make the industrial specs available to the user, you can provide them in other ways. For example, if you wanted the user to be able to print out the specs, you would provide blueprints in the appropriate format along with the game. There's also ...


4

As long as they're saved in a format which can be read by the game engine, industrial models can be used in games like any other model. Of course, Rendering all the extra faces you won't normally see (e.g. parts on the inside) will have an impact on performance. Also, while it certainly would be cool to have e.g. the results of a car crash calculated with ...


4

Thanks to dadoo Games my problem is solved. He was correct I needed to change my sampler state to wrap. I added this to my draw function to get it working: GraphicsDevice.SamplerStates[0] = SamplerState.LinearWrap;


4

You're looking at points on a continuum as if they're alternatives - Consider resolving a NURB to screen resolution, i.e. each pixel ties to an evaluation of the NURB for that point - the end result is that you're moving from a set of continuous functions to a discrete representation produced by evaluating those functions at specific points. In the most ...


4

Usually this is done through LODs (Level of Detail). This is just a name for having several models of the same object with different detalization. In the options you may specify the highest LOD to use. LOD models are usually made manually by artists because programmatic simplification often results in poor quality for anything more complex than a generic ...


4

This is a very tricky question that heavily depends on jurisdiction and the specific circumstances. As a general rule, the content you create belongs to you, and you can do whatever you want with it, no matter what tools you used to create it. Also, as a general rule, claims made by others are just empty words unless it's a law or a contract that you agree ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible