35

Making all character models the same size has a lot of benefits when doing poses and animations. Imagine, for example, a sit-down-on-chair animation. A character with longer legs has a different sitting pose than one with shorter legs. Or a character grabbing something. When the characters have different heights, their hands will be on different positions ...


16

In all the games I've worked on, the the Asset Creation Pipeline goes something like this: the concept artist (for levels/backgrounds/level models) or character artist (for models) will generate sketches for characters/levels/etc. usually multiple options are given to the creative director / lead art to decide which one they like better. The concept / ...


12

There are multiple ways to do this: The first and the most popular way is to create a skeleton for the model, then use this skeleton to move around the vertices of it. This is also usually done by the artist, because it needs to contain what areas are affected by which bone. When the animation is done the artist saves it in a file (for example the COLLADA ...


7

Animatable 3D models come with a skeleton (either the modeller or animator does this step of modelling, since it's in a bit of no man's land). The skeleton is made of bones, relatively positioned between eachother, and every bone is mapped to a set of vertices of the 3D model, with influence values ranging from 0 to 1 (0.2, 0.5, etc.). When this is done, the ...


7

Here is a simple answer: They do it all in 3D graphics applications like Maya or 3DS Max. First they do some concept arts (on paper), according to them they create models, textures (in Photoshop or something like that). Simple animations are done whole in software too, more complex animations are done via Motion Capture and then mapped to your model. For ...


7

Here is the map of Chicago from Watch_Dogs: And here is the map of Chicago from Google Maps: As you see, these maps don't have much in common. When seen from a birds-eye perspective there isn't even a superfluous similarity. You will also notice that the map from Watch_Dogs is tiny compared to real-world Chicago. Actually, Watch_Dogs Chicago has barely the ...


5

If you just need it once, I'd suggest you pick up some basic knowledge of a modelling tool. It's very easy to do in Blender: Delete the cube that you start with by pressing DEL. Create an UV Sphere primitive. This will create a sphere with radius 1.0 (Note: In the lower left corner you can edit the properties (segment/ring count, radius) of the sphere after ...


4

The programmers actually can define each vertex individually if they want to. This is, of course, never the case unless they're making some sort of basic cube demo. Normally, what's saved in the model files is something along the lines of a list of vertices that the programmer can effortlessly easily plug into their model-drawing code. There's obviously more ...


4

You need to set the mesh to smooth, then "cut" the edges that have to be sharp by duplicating them. You need to select the edges you want to make sharper, then hit Ctrl + E and choose the "edge split" option: The normals automatically orient themselves:


3

No your meshes do not lose polygons. Only the amount of fragments generated by the polygons will be reduced. If you think about it, where would the polygons go? You still need all of them to make sure you have correct result when rendering your scene. Even the sub-pixel sized polygons are usually included in final image. In some cases though, the rendering ...


3

Usually to render a large quantity of gird aligned cubes is to use a method known as "Marching cubes". Note: the main alternative is to use ray casting and voxels (point cloud data), which is less common in video games, however it is the standard in medical imaging. See also: A Fast Voxel Traversal Algorithm for Ray Tracing. You will see "Marching cubes" ...


3

UE4 does not have exactly an inherent limit to what you can simulate at the engine. Nothing like a map size limit or something. However, besides the obvious memory and CPU hardware-limitations that a huge simulation might face, at least another indirect partial limitation related to software, i.e. in this case to UE4, does apply. It is the fact that most ...


3

One of the best Unity-specific level-editing tools is ProBuilder. Tools like Maya and Blender are generally my recommendation for 3D art, but you did ask for CSG.


3

You can't generalize that because the resources consumed by an entity (CPU, system-memory, bus bandwidth, GPU and GPU-memory) vary greatly depending on their components. Do they have colliders? Do they have renderers, and if yes how complex are their meshes and their shaders? Do they have scripts? Do they have rigidbodies? Are they animated? All that (and ...


3

First of all, you need to check if the line intersects the octant. You have 3 cases: The line is completely contained within the octant (the x, y, and z coordinates of the endpoints are positive). This is the easiest one to solve, you simply draw the line as it is. One of the endpoints is outside, but one of them is inside the octant Both endpoints are ...


3

Inside the GPU pipeline, each vertex represents a unique combination of: a position (so we know where to draw this corner of the adjacent polygon(s) on the screen) a normal vector (which way the surface is facing at this point, so we can light & shade the attached polygons accordingly) texture coordinates (so we know which part of the texture to sample ...


2

I have been working on my own to try to put a game together. I can give you a simple list of the programs I use. Modelling: 3D Coat, modo Rigging: modo Textures: GIMP, Inkscape Game Engine: Unity Obviously this is a small list of applications, but for me they work and are affordable for hobbyist and indie developers.


2

I think your question is about modelling assets for your game and whether you should start with a low or high poly prototype. To me it makes sense to prototype quickly and therefore choose whichever takes you the least amount of time... That doesn't always mean low-poly (though in general it is usually quicker to build a prototype model out of simple ...


2

Low poly or high poly, the way to get a model to look like a cartoon is all in the shader material. You're looking for a Toon Shader, such as this one.


2

Collada (.dae) files seem to have support, according to 5-51 in the 1.4 specification: The <instance_geometry> element instantiates an object described by a <geometry> element. Collada is supported by most platforms.


2

If you generate box collider's on empty objects with shape of these boxes, and your scripts are on a parent of 2 objects that have these colliders, any of these colliders will trigger OnCollisionEnter() method, so don't worry about it, just remember to parent them to 1 object. Remember to set a pivot where you want - it will influence scaling. If this mesh ...


2

Ultimately, you can take whichever option suits you best, personally. You would easily get away with either. Leaving the Cubes Separate If you do not join the cubes, they should import into your scene as separate objects, grouped under a parent object to represent your character. This is fairly easy to run with, but there are considerations you should make:...


2

Combining several objects or animations into one will require slightly less computations (avoiding duplicated initializations, updates, etc), and will therefore have a slightly better performance. Regarding quality, whatever solution you use, you are able to produce the same level of quality (at the expense of slightly worse performance for example if you ...


2

Check out this video for the actual process: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKZIYc-Ayy8 It's more daunting than you might think, if you have no idea how it's done yet, the modern 3D pipeline is pretty gnarly. You have to first, separate the hard, non-organic parts of your model from the rest of the model. Increase the resolution of 'hard-surface' objects, ...


2

At moon distance/scale, you're unlikely to be able to see any benefit from a 3D model. Especially if the moon is tidally locked like ours is (only one side visible from the ground) A textured polygon may give you some advantages even, because it makes it easier to antialias the edges, or add a glow/halo. The moon's phases might be easier to tackle with a ...


2

This is a Kaleidoscope-like effect. Assuming you're implementing this in Unity or Unreal Engine, you would either use a particle effect or a postprocess effect. A particle effect would be used if you want the effect to show up somewhere in your 3D (or 2D) game world. A postprocess effect would be used if you want to modify the already-rendered image into ...


1

Seems I finally found a solution on my own. It is still not perfect, but looks much better! :) If you have further suggestions I'm open to everything. Basically on corners I need to "decorate" with additional geometry corners that are still part of a cube but with different normals. I think it is actually more performant than correcting normal maps and to ...


1

What do you want to do exactly? I mean, do you share any quality or have any qualification to do something in particular? For example i'm terrible at modeling and art but i'm not bad programming, then i'm focused on 3D engines(collisions, rendering, optimizations, algorithms...). The thing is to find what you are good at and you enjoy. If you want to learn ...


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