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15

I have done this, though it's not by any means simple. I'm working on a modification for the PSX NTSC release of Final Fantasy VII, 'Rebirth', that involves some minor changes to battle logic. Generally speaking the procedure is to Find the executable or overlays (this takes some reversing; you basically just have to watch for big chunks of data being ...


11

Make the modding tools very easy to use. There should be a tool for creating the mod, and a fast way to test the mod, ideally live creation if that's practical for your game. Make the distribution and installation of mods dead simple (think steamworks). People are more likely to make mods if they know they'll be used! A rating system will give recognition to ...


11

A very common method is to disable achievements when gameplay-affecting mods are enabled or cheats are used. Players want those achievements. But when they are using overpowered mods or cheats, they become meaningless anyway, so disabling them is completely reasonable. This encourages the player to try everything in the game in vanilla mode at least once. ...


9

You could look in the game code to find the code for enchanting. Since that takes away experience, it should tell you how, although it may be in levels. Also, you could look in the code for the anvil. In those, you should find variables for experience. You could probably subtract from those variables for every 2 or so blocks that you mine/dig/chop, like the ...


8

I'm going to start off by being That Guy and noting that this site is the wrong place for this question. It's a potentially non-trivial legal issue whose precise answer, under various circumstances, will likely depend on details of local law and legal precedent, as well as on the relative abilities of the lawyers on each side to twist said law and ...


8

You need to ensure your game will run properly on the NES hardware. With many 8 and 16 bit consoles, there are limited times you can access the hardware registers. Accessing registers outside the allowed time often results in the program not displaying any output. One emulator to consider is no$nes, another is fceux. The no$nes will warn you if you violate ...


7

Follow these two principles: Make your game data-driven. Make your data files human-readable.


7

It depends on what kind of modding the game allows. When the game in question already includes a sufficiently powerful script interpreter, one could write a transcompiler which takes a script written in Lua and transforms it into a program in the scripting language of the game so that it can be executed. Alternatively, one could even create a Lua ...


6

No, you can't really do this. First of all, PlayStation 1 games were shipped on CD, which is read-only media. By definition you can't write to it, so modifications are out of the question. So you may be thinking that you could grab an emulator and a CD image and modify that, but again you're stuck. You don't have the source code to the game, you don't ...


6

Note: This answer is in response to an earlier version of the question, which asked both whether P is liable in general and whether if P = M allows P to profit from copyright infringement" As I understand it, the primary question is "If a modder breaks the law, is the creator of the base game liable?" The answer to this is generally no. The other answers ...


6

You can't just open the jar in Eclipse. Even if you have some kind of decompiler-plugin, you will only see obfuscated code. You will need the Minecraft Coder Pack to decompile and deobfuscate the jar (as well as MCP can anyway) so you can work with the code. Additionally, if you want do develop Minecraft-Forge mods you should check out this page. Forge ...


6

Any unit against a certain type of unit with a particular DPS will have a specific TTK, or Time To Kill. You should balance your unit around that TTK, which is calculated as T = H / D, where T is the defending unit's TTK, H is the defending unit's health, and D is your attacker's DPS. If you want this new unit to die at the same time as the other two, you ...


6

A morally and legally sound way that can be openly discussed on a public forum like this one is to contact the original developer. If you meet with such circumstances, chances are the game is one of these 2: The game is new/early access, reasonably successful (otherwise there's rarely a modding community) and the developer hasn't gotten around to switch to ...


5

There are many factors that improve modding abilities in a game. Nevertheless, most games don't allow you to replace core programmings. But if your "hope is that anything can be replaced with custom code", there are two key features you should provide to the community. Your programming style must be clean and legit so that other people can easily understand ...


5

could block certain functions, but that wouldn't be nice for the modders It's perfectly nice for modders and is basically what everyone does. The only ones you need to restrict are the IO functions, of course, since Lua doesn't really include anything else out of the box. You can instead of "blocking" them replace them with your own versions that do extra ...


5

You cannot prevent it (in situations which are equivalent to running arbitrary native code supplied by others). You can: curate the mods screen submissions with a scanner restrict your API as much as possible select a language that is safety oriented sandbox foreign code All of these increase safety to varying degrees. But none of them are a guarantee.


4

One worry is that players would hack things that aren't meant to be. Then again, why not just let them do that? Modders usually create mods without commercial interest, so they add free value to your game. When your modding interface allows enough freedom, people might even buy your game just because of the mods (just think about how many Half Life 1 ...


4

Personally, I would allow 'low-level' access to modders. Your worry isn't really all that it seems - remember, if someone really wants to change something they shouldn't, they'll reverse engineer your game and change it anyway (or find some creative method, such as transferring a Skyrim game from Xbox or PS3 to the computer for the console). The question (...


4

You can't. The Xbox is a closed console without any support for user created content. The situation won't likely change, and even if it did, you'd need a hacked console, which would certainly void your warranty.


4

The most common solution is to use a hex editor and decompiled assembly and then poking at various bits of data or code after using the assembly to figure out which bits to poke and in which way. For more complex changes the common "attack" is to hijack a DLL. For example, if the game loads D3D, you could trick the system into loading a different DLL in ...


4

You can just use UnrealPak. Engine\Binaries\Win64\UnrealPak.exe somepak.pak -extract X:\extract\here


4

I am not a lawyer, for actual legal advise consult an actual lawyer. No, you can not have licensed cars without a license, and you probably won't be able to get one regardless. Car licenses are expensive, hard to come by and fraught with extra requirements (ever wonder why you generally won't get a Ferrari in a game with destructible cars?). Releasing a ...


4

Usual disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and in this site questions about these issues have to be always taken as ideas, thoughts or experiences, never as technical advice. That said, yes, if you or somebody from the developer team wants to use the names of the cars, the names of the car companies or the models of the cars, a license will be needed. Otherwise, ...


4

Learning to better help yourself is a wonderful thing, it helps you the most! With most things programming, doing a simple Google search first is typically the best route. Then there's the option of reading the documentation for the thing you're working on. Often they have helpful tutorials or manuals to help you. Once you find a good source for ...


4

A somewhat blunt approach would be to let modders write C# code and then have your game read & compile those scripts, using them as though they were code the game was built with. This has some advantages: Modders can use the existing Unity API, so it's already familiar to many, with extensive documentation and tutorials. It's very fast to get up and ...


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