6

You find out who currently owns the IP and you make them an offer. It's that simple, but... First complication is that the owner of an IP is not necessarily the same as the developer, who in turn is not necessarily the same as the publisher. The probability is that the IP was licensed to multiple parties during the course of making the game, and all of ...


5

Traditional roguelikes solve the save-scumming problem by making the saving system completely automatic. The game auto-saves the player's progress whenever feasible. Especially after something went wrong (including a game over, which deletes the savegame). But the player can not create manual savegames. That means the player can quit the game whenever they ...


4

To answer your question succinctly, RYB (red, yellow, blue) would be most intuitive and closest to mixing physical colors, aka pigments, which blend subtractively. To understand the mixing behavior of RYB color-space, see both the color wheel diagram in the question, as well as the color tree below. For your use case it seems to me it would be simplest to ...


4

The reason is often that the crafting process itself has no cost. If crafting is nothing but pressing a button, then you can not expect players to pay each other just to press that button. If you want crafting to create value in your game economy, then you have to make crafting itself more expensive for the player. Make crafting more complicated than ...


2

If you carefully read the text of Magic: the Gathering cards you will notice a distinction made between cards and 'permanents' and 'spells'. When a card is in play, say representing a creature that has been summoned, it is not just a card but a permanent. Things that aren't cards - like ephemeral 'tokens' made by other cards - are ALSO permanents if they're ...


2

I feel an attack that draws all aggression from enemies is very strong Unfortunately our feelings are often very misleading when it comes to game balance. The only way to find out if our feelings are warranted or not is to collect some data through playtesting. So I would recommend you to implement that feature in a provisoric way, try it in different ...


2

Whether a special ability is too strong or too weak depends on how it interacts with everything else in the game, and even on what inputs the player has to use to cause it to happen. Maybe you find that your taunt attack is so strong the party member never wants to use any other ability again once they learn it. Sure, if after testing you find that's what ...


2

To prevent players abusing saveing/loading before progressing, there are a few things you can do on your end. Which one you pick, depends on the game. Make saving expensive. Allow the players to save, but only if they have an item. This will make them think twice before saving. Example of a game doing this technique is Resident Evil 2 (2019). Limit the ...


2

How to balance the advantage of playing first or second is hard to address in general. It would largely come down to looking at the mechanics of your game, considering possible ways to benefit a player and doing play-testing to determine which player gets an advantage and how you could potentially get rid of that advantage. Also potentially consider what ...


2

As pointed out in other answers, the colour wheel most of us are familiar with doesn't match the way that pure light mixes - which is what's easiest to model with our usual representations of colours in a computer program. With pure light wavelengths, yellow and blue are complimentary in our vision system, and blending them yields black (if subtractively ...


1

The red-yellow-blue color circle invented by Le Blon in the 1720s is incorrect. You can't create perfect green by mixing equal parts blue and yellow. Creating a perfect magenta with red and blue is even harder - you usually end up with a muddy purple. And if you mix all three, you don't get grey, you get brown. People already noticed that in the 18th ...


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