4

Based on my limited knowledge, your choice of base game gives you some of the core mechanics pre-programmed, along with a few textures, models, sounds, and the like. As such, it seems that if you wanted to make a linear single-player game, stick with one of the Half-Life 2 games as a base, or if you wanted to make an arena multiplayer game, stick with HL2MP, ...


4

Yes, you can as long as you license the engine, with terms permitting it. The version of Source that comes with the games that you purchase is for modding those existing games, and you won't be able to produce executables with it (and if you do manage to, you're going to run into some other more costly problems). Interested in licensing Source, refer to ...


4

The source engine doesn't clear the back buffer simply due to the way levels are setup (i.e. it's not needed). Source engine levels are built from brushes (i.e. volumes are either added as solid/liquid or subtracted from other brushes) and the player (or more specific, the camera) is always in an enclosed space, even if the level is supposed to be outdoors. ...


2

It's object instance of class CMoveData. It handles movement. This can be found from code file you posted: CMoveData *pMove mv = pMove; So, mv is CMoveData The -> is the arrow operator. You can access class pointers using (for example) mv->m_nPlayerHandle.Get(). This is somewhat hard area to understand. There are couple of good answers on ...


2

Looks like you're missing one of your textures. The source engine, when it can't find a specific texture, instead shows a checkerboard of purple and black squares, the different settings probably mean that a specific texture isn't loaded. From looking around a bit the only references I can find to the settings and cvars you've mentioned are about lighting, ...


2

This is done with a skybox. In reality, the maps are still closed; they are simply using a special material which marks the space as to render the skybox, which is what ends up looking like the sky. Therefore, you must enclose the level with the "tools/toolsskybox" texture, while leaving sufficient space for things like grenade throws to happen. There are ...


1

The client is currently at Tick=115, but the server is at Tick=130, but why?! Why is the client behind? Because the client has to wait until it has information from the server in order to process it. So in this case you can assume that the client has a ping of 15ms because that is the difference between the two. The client can't process past tick 115 ...


1

Turns out the problem was that I had not given my func_instance_io_proxy a name. I will leave this question posted in case anyone else has the same problem.


1

Modifying textures on the CPU is usually very, very slow. What you'd prefer to do is use Render to Texture- you use data from your program in a shader to render to something that is not the screen (render target). Taking your minimap example, drawing an X on the player is as simple as sending the map background texture, X texture, and the player position ...


1

Your model most likely has incorrect normals (pointing inward) in some places. If you made this in Blender, I know there's like a recalculate normals button that should have them all going the correct direction.


1

Your issue is likely a mismatch between material name in the .mdl file and material name in the QC file. Open the decompiled flamethrower model in your 3D modeling program, copy the assigned material name text, and paste it so your new model has the same material name. I believe the stock flamethrower's material name is models/weapons/c_items/c_flamethrower....


1

Basically, "mv->" means "the following property of mv". So, "mv->m_vecVelocity" means "the vector velocity property of the movedata". "mv" represents kinematic state of a physical object.


1

I think it's because those are 'dentils' (an architecture element. As such, they are spaced apart. They're supposed to go under a ledge. Google images of dentils. Oh, also, look at the file name and see if THAT is named 'dentil'. That'll tell you. As a workaround I'd put a background behind it.


1

Source works a bit different than i guess you understand it. I can't claim that everything i write now is correct but it should point you in the general direction! "Converting" a model: You can't just "convert" an model intended to be used on an specific NPC to a player model because the animations that you want to apply are called by actions, and the ...


1

You will need to convert the obj file to smd, and have your normal textures converted to vtf. There is a program to do this called OBJ2SMD. It turns your obj and png into smd and vtf by just dragging and dropping the model and texture into the program window. But it only lets you use ONE texture on the whole model. Here is the link: http://bob.gneu.org/...


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