94

Even with an engine, getting something to display on the screen the way you want it is not always trivial. There will be many instances where someone with programming knowledge is required to make the graphics display correctly. These people may be called graphics programmers in the credits (graphics programmer is not a certified or protected title, and the ...


74

It's important to understand that the hundred coders in a company will be implementing high-level designs, not making them. In design terms, you might get given a task like "design the graphic format to be used for all art assets" but you won't be given the task "design a way to encourage users to interact in groups of five to ten people". Or indeed be asked ...


65

Game engines are like kitchens, and developers (i.e. programers) are like cooks. Game engines offer possibilities, while the programmers exploit these possibilities to the needs of the game. Thus, game companies need graphics programmers to tailor the engine's graphics possibilities to the game's needs. If the game engine were to manage everything, ...


28

A publisher would not be able to protect you from someone else creating a more popular clone of your game. Games from large publishers get ripped off just as often as those from small indies. Maybe the publisher has enough money in their war chest to fight a legal battle, but considering that such lawsuits are expensive and the success rate is hard to ...


26

Yes, professional games use Blueprints. Some use a mix of C++ and Blueprints. We use both on Dead by Daylight. One of the great things about Blueprints is that non-programmers can get access to the ability to script behaviors. Not every project will use them this way, but it's one of the reasons they were designed. They replaced UnrealScript as the means ...


20

Companies don't upgrade VS willy-nilly. We're using 2010SP1 for instance on a project not planning to ship for several years. Using a newer version would mean buying new licenses to the IDE, possibility buying new licenses to plugins we use, and of course risking some show-stopping bugs that haven't been worked out. We already paid for 2010 and know 2010 ...


19

as said by Josh Petrie: "Not built here syndrome;" I am also writing my own engine, and I suppose the reason will be different for every developer out there, but in fact - I generally don't like working in other peoples code. I am compulsive in the sense that If I feel I could build it myself, then there's no point in settling for anything else. I ...


15

The absolute key reason to write your own engine (and it surprises me that nobody has called this out yet) is for debugging. If you've written a big, complicated game, and there's a crash bug in it, and you have the source code (and are intimately familiar with that source code by virtue of having written it), then you can simply attach a debugger to the ...


14

As for the NES (and SNES too mostly), here's a basic overview. I did not write any NES games but did write an NES emulator (Graybox) and did a fair amount of rev-engineering of old carts. As for programming language: yes, it was all assembly. Programming the NES meant working directly with hardware interrupts, DMA ports, bank switching etc. Luckily, ...


12

I’ve been working in the industry professionally for 15 years across a variety of companies and on multiple continents. The work environment all comes down to being in a position to choose the right company and/or right project. Some are good, some are bad. There are always signs which can inform which a company/project is likely to be before you go to ...


11

Gameplay programmers are responsible of the "game" part of the software. What this means is that they're usually responsible, depending on the type of game, for the 3Cs: Character - the playable character Camera - how the player sees the world Controls - how the player interacts with the world These tasks include a lot of dependencies with the engine, ...


11

There could be a lot of factors but the ones that come to my mind first are ease of use and compatibility. An AAA office environment would most likely have company-provided computers, meaning there would be very little variety in the OS and hardware that the program would need to support. This would mean fewer bugs, and it would also mean that if released ...


10

Anything is possible, but the situation you describe is highly improbable. Software developers rarely like picking up where someone else left off, and are much less likely to pay for that opportunity. However, you might be able to create a technical demo to try to pitch your game. Either to gain the funds (via crowdsource or otherwise) to hire developers ...


10

At my previous job as a backend dev at a game studio, the programmers had very little input into the gameplay/mechanics of the game. Occasionally a game designer or UI/UX designer would ask me if something they wanted to do was feasible, but that was the extent of my input into the design of the game. That was at a mid-size studio of around 40 people, at a ...


10

What money can you make from such a map editor? Prolonging the lifetime of a game is great for the customer, but for the studio? Blizzard had to keep the original Battle.Net servers online much longer, and with much greater capacity. That costs money. at the same time, sales of new copies of the game are almost non-existent. Users expect patches for new OS ...


10

A little anecdote from outside the games industry: We use UE4 for architecture visualization in VR. While I'd rather have most things built in C++, we also use Blueprints heavily for all kinds of "additional logic" like light switches, doors, etc. It's been this way for a little over two years now and I was the only programmer at the start of this endeavor....


9

The next step would be to secure a budget of several million dollar to hire a team of a few hundred experienced people, because that's what it would take to create the greatest game ever. Do you have several million dollar laying around? Or do you know any publishers who would trust you with a million dollar budget because you have a solid track record of ...


9

There are very good answers here but they're missing one important additional point. Many of today's licensable engines started out as dedicated engines. Let's take Unreal as an example because it's so ubiquitous. Today when you think of Unreal you tend to think of an engine that you license and can use instead of having to build your own, but that wasn't ...


9

I have worked on a big-name game officially as the AI programmer, in truth I didn't have that much interest in other design aspects but I had to analyze the game mechanics carefully and do an awful lot of play-testing in the process of implementing the AI. As such I ended up in a good position to critique design aspects. My suggestions on design were almost ...


7

I don't know if this terminology has the same meaning across countries, but the terms can definitely be used to describe distinct topics. Note that, related to the terms game technology and game development, there also exists the term game design. Game technology Game technology refers to the development of supporting technologies for games, independant of ...


7

You can ship games without a graphics programmer pretty easily now-a-days because of all the engines. What you generally need a graphics programmer for are things like optimization A graphics programmer would know and/or learn how a particular engine works and be able to direct the artists or modify the materials or merge models or use other techniques etc ...


5

Health warning: The following comes with a large amount of hindsight and I'm sure it's one of many experiences within game dev - but it's worth considering I'd like to offer a perspective from someone who left game development to do something different, who is a similar age to you. I was a developer at a first-party studio for five years straight out of ...


5

Consoles have their advantages. You know exactly what hardware and software environment your game is going to run in. No targeting a huge array of combinations of GPUs (which might or might not have up-to-date drivers), CPUs and amount of memory players might have, no testing on different operating systems or versions of the same operating system, no ...


4

Basically, you want something that can show to an employer what you've done in your industry. If you're an artist, you'd want to showcase art you've done. Things like sketches, college projects, work from previous jobs (assuming they allow you to post them.) If you're a programmer it's usually links to personal (game) projects you've worked on and details ...


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