Hot answers tagged

68

First of all, saving on work equipment is often saving at the wrong end. Giving your employees suboptimal equipment does not just hamper their productivity physically, it also hampers their productivity psychologically because they do not feel valued. But on the other hand, if you just ask your employees to pick out any equipment they want and don't give ...


40

Digital colors can be made up of three components: red, green, and blue. Combine these together, and you get final color, eg. yellow is 100% red, 100% green and 0% blue. The fourth component is, as you mentioned, transparency. Together, these form the tuple RGBA (red, green, blue, alpha) which represent an image. Now, instead of pixels, think about it ...


39

You need an art lead and proper art style documentation. There are things like palettes to determine, plus various bits of example concepts, a lot of art terminology that clearly defines things to artists in ways that tech terminology clears things up for developers. A good art lead can define all these and make your consistent art style, and properly ...


30

Laptop is a waste of money, everything else is acceptable. Ergonomic mouse and mount for tablet is a must. If he is going to be drawing for 8 hours a day, he will need it for health reasons. Large drawing tablet is also acceptable. It's easier to work with a large canvas. In regards to the laptop? Why? High end laptops are 4 times the cost of a high end ...


22

I want to add a slightly different point of view from what has been previously answered. First, I disagree that gameplay is the only important thing in a game. Visuals sell, and you will most likely have your game played by other people if you show a pretty screenshot that catches their eye. Because of this, I do not recommend you disregard art, or use stock ...


19

The spikey intense orange objects are pushing in front of everything. In visual arts, distance is indicated by: Paler colors. Just changing your intense orange/rust color to be less saturated will help loads. Lighter colors. blending object's natural color with sky color or with a bland light color such as light gray or a pale sky blue. Related to this: ...


17

Make them less sharp Implement parallax when moving the camera Add some haze Add other objects near them to give perspective on their size (like cloud caps). Add objects of known size (like trees) spreading into the distance and still in front of the mountains Add foothills around their base


15

The question "How can I work with an arbitrary amount of artists, yet maintain artistic consistency across the entire game?" cannot be solved with a one-size-fits-all answer - it is dependant on your specific project. If you edit your question and provide more details on your specific problem, then perhaps we can help with your problem of scale and ...


12

This will depend entirely on the license applied to the art assets. The number of open source licenses is always growing, so attempting to provide a list here would be pointless. You will need to research the specific license that's applied to the art. Some of these licenses will allow you to reuse the art. For example, in the link you provide, a majority ...


11

It depends on the contractual agreement you have with your client. If they own all source art assets you create, then the safe answer is "no".


8

Donkey Kong Country or Abe's Oddworld Oddessy both come to mind as using 3D models to make 2D Sprites. That was from back in the day when computers were powerful enough to model complex 3D assets, but consoles and PCs were not yet able to display those high quality renders in real-time. The examples you could find of this are near limitless. The actual ...


7

When you want to create a game without access to artistic talent to create artwork, you could go for a graphic style which is rather abstract than representative. You could, for example, represent all gameplay objects with geometric shapes, like in Geometry Wars.


7

I'm the Flare creator (main developer and main artist). Drop me a message if you have specific questions. All of Flare's art can be reused commercially. Some assets are CC0, some are CC-BY, some are CC-BY-SA. It's important to know the requirements of each asset you use and that you credit each artist. Share-Alike assets can only be remixed with other ...


7

If you work in a big company, there will probably be few 3D artists for specific tasks. One of them might be soft body modeller that will do characters and animals, etc. You can be level designer, make some fences, houses, rocks, perhaps lightining artist which is really crazy if you are good one. You can type in your portfolio that you are level designer ...


7

You can't give ambient occlusion to things when there is no light. After all ambient occlusion effectively simulates shadows. Add more light sources (and use shadows) If you add light sources to the game (lava, camp fires, mining lights, glowing mushrooms, etc.) you can go in and start giving things shadows which will make it seem more 3D and add details. ...


6

Usual caveat: I am not a lawyer, this is not legal advice, the relevant laws vary from country to country, city to city, etc. The basic concepts are these: you own one instance of the truck. You can sell your instance of the truck to someone else (according to the first sale doctrine, which states that the Copyright owner's distribution rights only apply ...


6

I can think of a few edge cases: Tech Artists are basically the people who work to bridge the gap between programming and art. The actual responsibilities of the role varies between teams and companies. One team might use a tech artist largely for building plugins for their art tools, another tech artist might be there who mostly does rigging, etc. You'll ...


6

A texture is a simple idea. You say you've tried some and they didn't look good. If you created the texture out of polygons would it look better? Or better yet, maybe try making the ground a flat plane made out of triangles, but vary the color of the triangles. Either use shades of green, or have both green and brown for grass and dirt, maybe white for ...


5

Eyes are just balls. There's nothing expressive about a ball. What's expressive are the muscles around the eye, which not many games model. For example, think about the squint of anger, or the relaxed eyelids when you're bored.


5

I have had some luck by using GIMP 2.8.2 and the DDS plugin for GIMP. It allows for opening, editing, and modifying the main image and the sub-levels, and then saving them. The levels are presented as layers in GIMP. I don't have any experience for the quality of the exports, as I've only actually had to use one level of mips in my own projects. GIMP ...


5

You can get official Microsoft logos here: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/ImageGallery/logos/logoguidelines.aspx (You have to agree to their terms in order to get to the logo part). Here you might get some publicly available assets: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/imagegallery/products/default.aspx (Well, there isn't a top-down shot of X-Box ...


5

It's possible. Perhaps less feasible. Many artists focus purely on modelling machines or architecture, for instance. Or characters. But for game designers, it's a bit different. You tend to need to be less of a brilliant artist and more of a generalist in order to cover different design topics. It does depend though on the types of games you want to be ...


5

I found an efficient way to build a city fast (or whatever you're trying to build) is definitely to go modular, and make indexed fittings for your buildings. For example: Single buildings, referenced as A, B, C, etc... Signs, skins, etc. associated to each: Now you can mix and match to create a dynamic city quickly Of the approaches I've tried, this ...


5

The internet is full of copyright violations. Just because you see people posting 3rd party art assets doesn't mean that they are allowed to. You might wonder "but they didn't get sued, why should I"? Maybe SNK hasn't found out about the copyright violation yet. Maybe they can not locate the violator. Maybe it's not worth their time because the violators ...


5

Consider using 3/4 top-down perspective. This is the look that most old-school top-down games used specifically to create depth. Some examples: Old Zelda games Old Final Fantasy Games Pokémon (even once they transitioned from pure pixel art) Binding of Isaac (Rebirth) is a good non-RPG example, it involves a lot of shooting: (the room walls aren't ...


4

There is an unofficial but extremely complete set of controller button images for several platforms here: http://opengameart.org/content/free-keyboard-and-controllers-prompts-pack


4

Some games, such as roguelikes, feature graphics made up of nothing but colored ASCII characters. Dwarf fortress is a deep and complex game modeled after roguelikes. Here's what its graphics look like:


4

Game sprites move over all kinds of different background together with other sprites. For that reason it is important to work cleanly regarding transparent and non-transparent parts of an image. When you create digital paintings or concept scetches, it is usually not that noticeable when you draw a bit over the outlines, don't fill the outlines completely, ...


4

Firstly, a 2:1 ratio is not isometric. It is a similar-looking dimetric projection (where two of the three axes are equally foreshortened, and the vertical axis is slightly less so) Isometric projection is when all three axes are equally foreshortened. An axis-aligned square tile lying in the horizontal plane has an isometric projected width:height ratio of ...


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