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157

Fees & Taxes One common way to deal with this in real economies is to add a periodic fee that redistributes hoarded wealth back into the community. A few forms this can take: Wear on gear items that requires they be repaired periodically, so even a player who's hit a steady state and buys no new items still needs to pay NPCs (or other players) for ...


87

Because voice acting is more expensive than just the payment for the actors. It's not just the voice actors you need to hire. First, you need to find voice actors which are suitable for your roles. That means you will have to do a casting with many actors, which takes you a lot of time. Then when you have picked the actors and made contracts with them, you ...


85

There is a critical flaw in your system. You assume players will play forever. In the real world, this is the case. "Players" keep "playing" the game until they die, and then their remaining wealth gets redistributed to their heirs. Not so in an MMO. Players play until they get bored. Then they find a new game and forget about yours. Then their wealth ...


66

This is not for performance. This is a failsafe. If the world saves every few minutes, then if something happens to the server and it shuts down everyone will only lose a few minutes' progress. By saving on disconnect, if the server has an issue everyone will lose everything they have done since they logged on. For those on particularly long play sessions (...


58

The problem with this system is that it just fights the symptom, not the cause. Inflation means that money loses value, because players have too much of it. It's not the items which become more expensive, it's the money which becomes less valuable. When nobody needs money, they won't sell anything to the trading house (I won't call it "auction" house, ...


48

By simply only loading those parts of the world into memory which are close to the player. Anything else is suspended to hard drive. When there is a tiny object laying around two kilometers away, then the player can not see it and can not interact with it. So there is no reason to update it or send it to the GPU for rendering. The smaller the object and its ...


27

Publilius Syrus clearly stated it already in ~100 BC: Everything is worth what its purchaser will pay for it. Adam Smith explained why: prices represent an intersection of supply and demand curves. You ignore the basic fundamentals, with a result we know all too well from failed non-capitalist economies: there's simply excess demand or excess supply. What'...


27

Your calculation makes a couple mistakes which might change your actual traffic and bandwidth requirements a lot. Not every information needs to be updated with the same frequency For example, the look of the avatar. You only need to tell clients how an avatar looks when they either encounter that avatar for the first time or when that avatar changed its ...


26

It's unlikely to make sense. When I get 100 Zorkmids from Player A and 100 Zorkmids from Player B, I have 200 Zorkmids. When I then pay 50 Zorkmids to Player C, will C get them from the Zorkmids I got form A or those I got from B? Do I have control over this? Does it even matter? A Zorkmid is a Zorkmid. It definitely doesn't matter for real-world banks ...


24

I've worked on a couple of game servers, including a suite of them for an MMO. In general, they don't have physics at all. In the few situations where physics are necessary (jumping, primarily) we let clients calculate their own physics, and we just deny anything that's too outlandish (players moving too fast for too long, going much higher than they ...


22

Gameplay reasons Many players would like to have online games as a fair competition where the most skilled (or most determined) players are most successful. Other players buying their way to success by using money they acquired outside of the game could be seen as detrimental to their game experience. Economical reasons Many games have an item mall as one ...


22

You have two very different things to manage: The server must manage the entire world, in an authorative manner. For that, communication with N clients (where N is "massive") is necessary. The client could, in principle, know about the entire world, but it needs not. For the client, it is sufficient to know about what's nearby the player. Assuming for ...


20

Note: This answer was written for an earlier version of the question which lacked any details about what the project was actually about. While it does not answer the new version of the question properly, I will leave it up, as it might help others. I'm sorry, but you can't do such an estimate without having a prototype. Not every MMORPG is the same. ...


16

1000 player may or may not be a problem. It depends on how often you need to update the database. However there is a simple solution: put the database on its own server. I had a peek at how the database system works a game that people would call an MMO-Lite – which one I will not disclosure – yet I can tell it consistently has more than 1000 players, this ...


15

Some reasons I can think of, some of which may or may not apply to your specific examples: Monetization: limiting the amount of actions in an addictive free to play game, and then offering to unlock more actions by paying money is a common way to monetize games. Game balance: by limiting the amount of actions a player can make in a day, you can force ...


15

Independent of feasibility (yes, depending on scale) there are often better or easier ways. For instance, in your typical MMO, the server really only needs to know about the coarse navigation map used by AI and player pathfinding. Instead of storing the location of a tree, you can instead just cut a hole into the navmap at the location of the tree. Likewise ...


14

We are using Command Oriented Interface/Architecture to audit user activity. It means that requests to the server, cause the server side to instantiate instances of classes that represent commands (atomic actions the user can preform). For instance, lets say the user makes a purchase in an item store: //We could have done something like someShop.sell(item,...


14

One element the other answers have not touched on is size. Sound files are substantially larger than text files. Every single spoken line is that much more data that must be downloaded to the player's system, written to their HDD, or usually both. In turn, spoken dialogue takes up more memory when the game is executed. Memory that could be used for ...


14

Background In the real world, there are (almost) no Scrooge McDucks. Instead rich people invest most of their surplus money, i.e., they lend it to other people. Suggestion Let x be the amount of gold available per player (1000 or 10000 in your examples). Every piece of gold that a player has above x is available for lending to shopkeepers, i.e., your ...


13

You don't nerf, you balance. Like someone mentioned earlier, is it fun because it's overpowered or are players simply using the overpowered functionality, albeit boring, to push their progression? If it's the former, balance everything else UP instead of pushing your one fun gameplay element down. Once things are more on the level you should be able to ...


11

Besides the other good answers given, I want to add the fact that some physics commonly is not driven by the server or even know about by the server and is a common trick to make the world seem more rich without adding overhead to the networking or server side processing. For instance there might be debris you can kick around on the ground or blowing around ...


11

I'd propose a very easy solution. Hierarchical Quest Requirements Basically, your quest prerequisites are: A state/states the player has to be in ( 10000 reputation with PotatoCows + 10 quests finished for Banshees ) A set of actions the player has to finish ( Kill Goblin Queen, Save Evil Brother and baptize him ) Let's classify actions using tags. The ...


10

When you want perma-death to matter as much for the victim as it matters in real-life, you also need equivalent consequences for the killer. In just about any real-life society (present or historical), murder is the crime which receives the highest punishment that society is willing to administer. In any judical system of today, a murderer is either ...


10

One of the reasons why there are protections is that reading the game state could allow bots to know the state of the game and act accordingly. For instance, grinding in a MMO: if the "bot" knows what mob is around, it can send commands to the game clients to select the mob, hit it until its life is 0, pick up the loot, rinse and repeat. With this, even if ...


9

My question is why are there not more games which take this approach of a game economy tied directly to real money? I think the answer lies in what a game is. To most people, a game is something where you relax and can have carefree fun. Some people will have more fun if game money is real money, but others will have less fun. So inherently it seems ...


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