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23

When you are asking for "all the rights", then you need to ask youself if you really need "all the rights". I don't know your long-term business plan, so I don't know which of these rights you actually need: Use the music for your current game (ok, that's obvious) Use the music for any future games Be the only one who is allowed to use the music for a game ...


14

This is mostly an unanswerable question, but I'll go through some of the things you mention. You don't have any useful skills to bring to the table - sorry to be blunt - so you basically have to bankroll the enterprise if you want anybody to take you seriously. Your main cost is the people you need to employ. Unless you know what sort of game you're going ...


4

Ultimately, I think a lot of people end up going to various game forums and posting requests for applicants. However I think that doing it this way leads to a lot of unqualified applicants and can waste a lot of your HR persons time sifting through them. When my company started hiring game developers and modelers, they ended up going to several game ...


3

"All the rights" is rather vague. Many intellectual property rights are applicable and even though this subject is covered by widely adopted international treaties, laws vary around the world. Some rights are transfered automatically, some by contract. Some can only be transfered by notarial deed and some rights are not legally transferable at all. Even if ...


3

The answer to your question is this: 1) Have skills that the industry needs. 2) Have a strong portfolio that you can show off demonstrating the skills from #1. 3) Make contacts in the industry. This means being active on social media networks that folks in the industry care about. 4) Collaborate on small projects with others to prove that you can work ...


3

Most of these large game companies have multiple development teams all around the world who work with all kinds of different technology stacks. Ubisoft, for example, currently has a couple job openings for Unity developers. EA itself is mostly a publisher who does little game development themselves. But the studios owned by EA have job openings for ...


3

The thing with CS jobs. It doesn't really matter what your degree is in, you can still get a job, as long as you can show that you're able to code. I know plenty of very smart developers who don't have their degrees in computer science. That being said, there is still the "getting your foot in the door" part of the job, when people don't know what you can do ...


2

DesuraNet got a hiring/jobs section on their websites which is shared across ModDB & IndieDB. (Those are quite big developer/modding community's) I saw Mojang there a while ago hiring some artists for Minecraft too.


2

Professional In terms of a cheap programmer (one who is professional but on the low end) it's $50k a year or so; which means that they cost roughly $1k a week (full time.) On the cheap Were you to put up flyers at a local college or five you could likely get this done for a few packs of beer (or w/e) by finding someone interested in learning netcode or ...


1

You should look for imagination, creativity, ability to work with a team, from where he gets inspiration, ability to schetch out a quick example of an idea... there are a lot of things to take in consideration when hiring an artist.


1

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