149

Technical Reasons: Game made platform specifically: When some developers are making their games, they can sometime rely on platform specific functions. While the game engine might be able to build the game for multiple platforms, the non-game specific code might make a Windows specific call that either doesn't exist on other platforms or would require ...


134

Yes, you should care about Let's Players. In fact, you should make your game as appealing to them as possible. Reach out to them and encourage them to play your game. Let's Players have become one of the most important marketing channels for independent game developers. They are a great way to expose your game to a large and interested audience and most of ...


90

A Primer on Valuing Intangible Products What I need really is an advice as to is this price of around 15k Euro justified It is not justified at all. You're attempting to determine the market value of an intangible product (the mobile game) based purely upon its cost of production. This does not represent the true value of the product. The true value of ...


65

"People" have been declaring the death of 2D games ever since 3D games came into being. Hell, Sony even tried to outlaw 2D games of any kind on the PS1. And what's one of the most well-remembered PS1 games? Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. A 2D game. 2D games aren't dead; they will never be dead. Even if you wiped every 2D side-scroller off the face of ...


30

Because being available doesn't mean being free & instant. Supporting one more operating system, in its most simplistic form, means one more platform to provide technical support for. The more platforms you support = The more platforms you need to provide support for = Spending more time on support = Losing work time that could have spent improving ...


28

A publisher would not be able to protect you from someone else creating a more popular clone of your game. Games from large publishers get ripped off just as often as those from small indies. Maybe the publisher has enough money in their war chest to fight a legal battle, but considering that such lawsuits are expensive and the success rate is hard to ...


25

First of all, congratulations to releasing your game. Few people can claim to have created a commercially successful game all by themselves in just a year. You can be proud of that accomplishment. Now what's that accomplishment worth? It might help you to take a look at this from the other perspective: Imagine you had some money and you want to invest it ...


24

The main models I can think of are: Charge per copy - the traditional "software licensing" model, you charge your customers a retail price to "buy" a copy of the software and the subsequent right to install or play it. This is still a dominant model for software of all kinds including PC, console and mobile device games, even after the introduction of other ...


23

I think there are a few reasons why games may get easier (or appear to do so) A side effect of maturing code. Fixing bugs, adding new features and polishing existing features can all have the effect of reducing difficulty. So these games may actually be getting closer to the developers intended level of difficulty, where as they started too hard. For ...


22

I had a similar experience to the one you describe with some other game I will not mention, and ended up thinking about it in similar terms as you do. As Bálint says, it is a double edged sword. Yet that does not mean you cannot get ahead. What happens when they play the game for an online audience, then that audience gets to know the game. If this were ...


21

In this era old hardware has become a misnomer. Old hardware is not necessary slow. 6 years old is 2009 and DirectX11 was already existing. We still don't have much newer today. You need to consider two things: features power features This is the level of instructions that the hardware will support, DirectX9,10,11, or OpenGL something (this depends on ...


19

There are good answers so far, but let's get to the bottom line. According to Steam's June 2017 Hardware survey, 96.24% of users sampled used Windows. Of Windows users, 87.37% are either Windows 10 or 7, 64 or 32 bit. OSX variants represent 2.95% of users, and Linux variants total 0.72%. Time is money. Unless your market is niche and targets OSX or ...


17

Have a look at some similar questions under the marketing tag. Here are some things to do: Make the game worth playing (see comment) Get friends, family, colleagues, anyone to play it and tell people about it. This kicks off your initial word of mouth campaign. Social media. Facebook site, twitter account, blog, there are loads now. This will increase ...


17

Indeed 2D games still have a future in the game industry. I even think that 2D games are coming back in force, because of (most of the time) lower prices, because of less powerful devices, because of nostalgia. There is plenty of 2D Indy games such as World of Goo, Aquaria, Braid, Gish, Crayon Physics etc. with a very decent number of copy sold. There is ...


16

I agree with Ef Es, get a couple of people, parents/friends whoever, and watch them play through it. It's the worse to launch a game only to find it really hard because you were use to the game mechanics. I suggest maybe making a blog of the launch of your game, just go over the details, any updates can be listed there as well. If money isn't a concern, ...


16

Get a couple of friends and make them go through bugs and check all game assets. Think of ways of monetizing it, like implementing the Kongregate API or so.


15

I see two questions here: How can I secure funding for finishing my game? and How do I handle promotion of my game? Getting Started I believe this is the perfect situation to apply the Minecraft Model to. Setup a site for your game. Get registration working. Start selling subscriptions cheap, $1-3 a month, or even sell lifetime memberships for $10-25. As ...


14

My experience: 2012-11-26 CET: I called DEJUS (+55.61.2025-9115), and I was connected to someone who spoke fluent English. Things look good: It is not necessary to be a citizen of Brazil or to have a company registered in Brazil in order to apply for a rating. In this case, I was told, one just leaves the field CPF/CNPJ empty. I asked if it is OK to submit ...


14

The other answers here are good, but here is one that wasn't mentioned. I'm having this problem right now - my team is about to release a game made in Unity for Windows/Mac. We've gotten lots of questions as to why our game isn't on mobile. There are 2 main answers: 1) Phones simply aren't powerful enough to keep up with the game. Maybe we can reduce ...


12

The first step, is of course, finishing your game. The publisher rejection rate is high enough for even established professional game developers, with complete projects. Sloperama Lesson 11, Section V You want to essentially do everything in your power to be as noticed as possible. Publishing is very risky, even when your game is complete, and you want to ...


11

In 1605, Miguel de Cervantes published a book, "The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha" (now typically known simply as "Don Quixote"). It was (and remains to this day) quite popular. In 1614, an anonymous other author published a book, "Second Volume of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha", without permission. Cervantes was quite ...


11

I believe a copyright would be helpful, but you have intellectual rights to begin with, getting a registered trademark or trademark on the game name would also help protect from people using the name for "Sequels".


11

It sounds like your potential sponsors are similar to publishers in that you’re hoping to get financial backing from them & they’re hoping to get a return on their investment based on how well your game sells. A good starting resource is Cameron Davis’ Gamasutra piece, How To Pitch Your Project To Publishers (backup link). The entire article is very ...


11

The expectation that sequels be bigger actually balances out the trade-off between making a sequel and starting a new series. Starting a new series Advantages No expectation to one-up the last game Can experiment with new core mechanics Disadvantages It is hard to tell if players will even like the core mechanics. No prior marketing You start with an ...


11

You may want to look into the concept of annuities. The idea is that if you know what the expected income stream of an asset is, and you know what the cost of money will be, you can compute the present value of the asset. For instance, if you expected the cost of borrowing/loaning money during that period to average, say, 6%, and if an asset were to ...


10

I can't remember where I first heard it, but that's an old rule of thumb that doesn't hold up to much critical thought. Truly, it comes down to business objectives. If you don't plan on selling the game, it doesn't matter. The fact is, the more hardware you can support the bigger your potential market is. However, most independent developers aren't going ...


10

Anything is possible, but the situation you describe is highly improbable. Software developers rarely like picking up where someone else left off, and are much less likely to pay for that opportunity. However, you might be able to create a technical demo to try to pitch your game. Either to gain the funds (via crowdsource or otherwise) to hire developers ...


9

For some actual stats, here is a detailed survey conducted on Flash games in 2009: http://wiki.mochimedia.com/w/page/15156195/Flash%20Games%20Market%20Survey You' probably be only interested in some of the slides like below though (slide 18).


9

What I would recommend is: There are some lists to add it to, like this one (make sure you also update the feature matrix) or this http://html5gameengines.com/. Try following the same search patterns someone would follow when they're looking for a HTML5 engine. Do a Google search for HTML5 engine, see what shows up. If there are lists, see if you can add ...


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