72

Assets such as sound, video, models, and textures are a majority of the download and for each of these assets there are multiple versions. These multiple versions are to support various graphic options. By sending the assets needed for a low graphics option first (which also happen to be the smallest ones). You have everything you need to play the game ...


33

I once implemented this for MMOs. One weekend while attempting to install WOW for my daughter took 48 elapsed hours, (patches, download errors, etc.) so I decided to make my own better solution. The game usually needs say 10 GB of data before it will run. Not all files are actually needed right away, but games used to wait until all files were locally ...


8

Just run the OpenAL installer inside of your install process. You should be deploying your game with some sort of installer anyway to include libraries you might have and do other legwork, so just include another step in your build process to install OpenAL with the silent flag. For OpenAL this is: /S or /s or -S or -s The installation runs in silent ...


7

Obviously not a lawyer, so this isn't legal advice, but my personal interpretation is: The code is licensed under Apache License, Version 2.0. If you read the Redistribution section: You may reproduce and distribute copies of the Work or Derivative Works thereof in any medium, with or without modifications, and in Source or Object form... So, yes, ...


5

I found an answer on the Unity Forums. When PlayStation Mobile was still alive, you could test on a Retail Vita, but now that is not the case. You are required to use a PS Vita Developer Kit in order for Unity to deploy and test.


5

Basically you're out of luck. XBLIG games, whether published or unpublished, require an Internet connection to run. I see two alternatives: 1) Use a mobile phone to set up your own mini-network and somehow give your Xbox an Internet connection. 2) Use a laptop to demo your game instead. XNA games run on PC. Xbox controllers can be plugged into a PC via USB ...


5

The iPhone 3GS is just as capable as the 4 (armv7, ogles2, latest iOS software) and there are a decent number of them out there. I don't think there's any way to prevent those devices from seeing your game in the store so unless you want the occassional bad review I'd try to support them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_iOS_devices


5

Regarding your example, OpenGL is always dynamically linked because its implementation is provided by the graphics card manufacturer, so each time OpenGL is patched you don't need to rebuild/re-link all the applications. OpenGL on windows is installed when you install the Graphics Card Driver like Nvidia, or ATI, and the OpenG32.dll is usually installed in ...


4

Seeing as this is XNA, the simplest method is probably to use ClickOnce. This has built-in support for managing updates for you. See the tutorial on MSDN, which points out where in the ClickOnce wizard you can set up automatic updates (you can also modify these settings in the project properties later on).


4

If you publish your game through Steam you don't have to provide your own update mechanism – I'd even strongly suggest not doing so. While this gives some control away from you (i.e. you have to wait for Valve to push updates), it let's you forget about all the update handling and your players also won't hit problems in case they verify Steam's cache ...


3

Because the default settings on the web player are low and on the unity editor are good. You can go to Edit > Project Settings > Quality, the default settings checkbox is in green light, you can change it in row Default and pressing the dropdown arrow.


3

I can't verfiy this right now (no XNA installed), but I'm pretty sure the following should work: Add the text file to your project. Open the file's properties (within VS) and set the following values: Build Action: Content Copy to Output Directory: Copy if newer (or Copy always) Then open the project properties, select the "Publish" tab and click on "...


3

Also in some games end-game world areas and files are delayed, only the mandatory areas are kept, and can also be installed while still playing the game.


3

The question is a little stale, but in case it still helps: After you run ./gradlew html:dist to generate production code, you want to copy everything inside ./html/build/dist/ to your server. Running that command produces the code in that directory. The code that's under the war directory and that has a Tomcat-like structure, I believe all that is for ...


2

According to the Google Code page, the license is attribution + share-alike. I quote (emphasis mine): Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. That means "yes."


2

One simple method is to provide a 'launcher' that checks for an update using the HTTP protocol, downloads it with HTTP, installs it and then starts the game. 1) User starts the game (which is actually the launcher). The launcher downloads and parses some kind of manifest file that details the available updates. The manifest may look something like this ...


2

To summarise what several people have said, and maybe add some information: initial download is small, just the startup files and download manager for the rest. Would be nice to include account creation, avatar creation, and maybe the start zones in this. while that's running, the user is logging in and creating their avatars, start downloading other stuff, ...


2

You should store your game data in C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\yourgame\ as it is a logical place to put "appdata" and it does not require admin to access . You should give the user the option to decide if they want to have a desktop shortcut to the launcher. Include an easy way to do this without doing first time setup as well as a button to open the ...


2

The reasoning and processing at points 5-8 is fixed for a given pair of old version and latest version. Therefore, do it once on the update server: the protocol can be simplified to a single exchange in which the patcher says the installed game is version X and the server sends a "recipe" with a list of the appropriate incremental patches and replacement ...


2

Create two separate applications: Your actual game and a launcher. Configure your installer to create shortcuts for the launcher, not the actual game. When the launcher is executed, it first goes online and checks if there is an update for your game. When there is, it downloads it and patches the copy of the actual game. A lightweight way to do this is to ...


2

According to an answer on Unity Answers, you need to put the scripts used for building into a folder named Editor (specifically, ./Assets/Scripts/Editor). Here's a full working build script: using UnityEditor; using UnityEngine; class BuildSrcipt { static string[] scenes = { "Assets/Scenes/MyScene.unity" }; static string name = "MyGame"; [...


1

You need to start by separating the concept of updating from the concept of repairing. The algorithm is roughly the following: Get the claimed version of the client. Ask the server for that version. The server returns the checksums for that version, and whatever or not there is a new version. Check the integrity of the files with the provided checksums. ...


1

It's common to need to wait a while when you want to actually test your game on the device, since it doesn't only include sending the data over USB cable. They probably count the time it takes to instal the game in the "pushing" process. That's why you can use the Editor and Unity Remote (it's on the play store) for instant testing. Btw an empty Unity game ...


1

Here's a launcher I made about a year ago: package Joehot200; import java.awt.Dimension; import java.awt.EventQueue; import java.awt.Toolkit; import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.EOFException; import java.io.File; import java.io.FileOutputStream; import java.io.FileReader; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStream; import java.io....


1

I have tried to make an update system for my game, and this is how far I got. First, connect to my server, and download an .ini file containing the name of the newest version of the game: http_get_file("http://mywebsite.com/game/Versions.ini", working_directory + "/Versions.ini"); The first part tells Gamemaker where to find the file online, and the last ...


1

The StreamReader looks for the file in the current folder (if you just start your App it will be the folder of your ".exe") and in all $path$ folders (e.g. in the Window folder). If you open a CMD window and enter echo %path%, you will see all of the valid paths. To access your file at runtime you have to follow the following steps: 1) Get the Application-...


1

I found the answer in Aurelien Ribbon's forum: http://www.aurelienribon.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2 This is easy to do: Create a project for your library (we'll refer to it as the "mylib" project), Add gdx.jar and tween-engine-api.jar to its build path (put these files in its "libs" folder, which you have to create), Add your source ...


1

I haven't tried this, but you could attempt to put the openal32.dll and wrap_oal.dll files along with the rest of your bins. It should technically work, but again I have not tested this.


1

Your issue is not related to inserting a link in the Games Explorer. It's likely a install error. This issue has been reported to Microsoft, and received some attention, but wasn't followed up on. Microsoft has a recommendation for solving this issue: The file that is reported as missing should have been installed into the correct location when Visual ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible