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I'm following the "Unity Essentials" tutorial series on learn.unity.com. In the module Create a structure with primitives, it says,

As you build this structure, you might want to change your view of the Scene to make sure GameObjects are aligned. For a review, see Navigating the scene.

I do not understand what it means by "change your view of the Scene to make sure GameObjects are aligned". I have previously completed the linked tutorial, and I reviewed it again to see if I missed something; I can find no reference to the alignment of Game Objects. I understand that it is possible to align scene view to camera view (select camera, then choose Game View > Align view to selected), but I'm not certain that is what is meant. Google searching has turned up several hits for aligning objects to one another by a certain attribute (center, corner, etc) but that also sounds wrong.

What is the intent of the instruction, and what's the best way to achieve it?

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    \$\begingroup\$ I think you're over-thinking this. This sentence just means "you might want to look at your object from different angles to make sure it's in the position you want it to be in". \$\endgroup\$
    – DMGregory
    Mar 12, 2022 at 4:45

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The term simply means to:

  • Move/Pan (use the hand tool)
  • Orbit (drag with left-click while holding alt)
  • Zoom (drag with right-click while holding alt)
  • Focus (by pressing the F button while your cursor is in the scene view and the game object is selected)

To ensure that your structure looks just as you want. Though, if your future project is 2D then there is no need to orbit around as it is not available.

The main thing to remember here is from which angle the object would be seen in the game, if you have a fixed camera then it just needs to be okay in that angle (this is more of a personal preference than a fact)

Also, have a look at the flythrough mode, It's used for navigating too.

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