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To run Direct3D 9 in debug, it is necessary to "install a 'checked' version of the OS".

The checked version of Windows comes in both full and partial flavors. It seems that the partial version is much less obtrusive to install than the full version. But, will that be sufficient to run Direct3D 9 in debug mode?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What version of Windows are you using? A partial checked build only has the kernel and HAL built 'checked', so you would have a retail (non-checked) version of user-mode D3D9.DLL. \$\endgroup\$ – Chuck Walbourn Feb 1 '17 at 6:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ChuckWalbourn I am using Windows 10. I take it from your comment that the answer to this questions is 'No'. You can submit that as an answer and I'll accept it if you are sure of it. \$\endgroup\$ – Zachary Burns Feb 1 '17 at 21:56
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A partial checked build only has the kernel and HAL built 'checked', so you would have a retail (non-checked) version of user-mode D3D9.DLL.

To get debugging support, you need a checked version of D3D9.DLL which means a 'Full checked' build.

Note that the only real debugging tool for Direct3D 9, PIX for Windows, is not compatible with Windows 8.x or Windows 10.

Of course the real question is why are you still developing/debugging legacy Direct3D 9 apps?

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