8

Draw a shadow sprite like you draw your character before the character (to make it appear behind him). Make sure its X position is updated according to the character, but the Y position stays on the tile. You have got a shadow.


4

You could develop your own SOAP or REST API, host it on a website and have your apps connect to that. You'd have full control over it and wouldn't have to pay for anything (other than hosting, of course). There is more of a development cost up front than using some kind of pre-built package, but you have the control to scale as you need to and make the API ...


3

Using the information from your previous question, you know what the delta of the drag was. This gives you distance. The only other thing you need to get velocity is a time. So, record the time when the touch even started, and when it finished. The difference in those times is the time it took for the gesture to complete. Now you have distance and time. So ...


3

You can't. Important parts of their infrastructure are contained within the Game class. (Also, GameComponent's constructor takes a Game.) My advice (as always) is to not use GameComponent. Like the Game class itself, game components are a completely optional part of the framework. And often they're more trouble than they're worth. You're better off just ...


2

Mark the starting position of the drag. Then compare against the end position. The difference between them will tell you the direction. With XNA, this is provided for you in the form of GestureSample.delta The delta is a Vector2 that contains the difference for each axis. For example: If you moved up and to the right, your delta vector might look like (10,...


2

The quickest/simplest approach is to get the position and time of the touch and then get the position and time of the release. Then dividing the position difference (which is a vector) by the time difference you have an approximation to the velocity. However, there are more complicated ways to do this which can be desirable in some cases. For example, if ...


1

It may not be the best answer but, Make an object called ShadowChecker that constantly draws a rectangle/line below the player. Use collision detection to adjust the height of the rectangle/line until it's not colliding with any object besides the player AND there is a platform just below the collision box. Then check the Y position just below the ...


1

What are you trying to do is to implement resolution independent rendering with Camera2D features. The sprite shift is caused by the device viewport not being resized correctly when you change screen resolution so it is always begin to draw the scene from the left screen side. If you don't like to reinvent the wheel let me advice you to look at the complete ...


1

In XNA, you won't find any direct analog to the Android method you linked. You are also correct that SpriteEffects is not the answer to your problem (it's a very short enumeration). If you want to display an animation, you will have to manually display different sprites sequentially, which is commonly accomplished with a sprite sheet that contains the ...


1

Well as far as I have it, it will probably be easiest for you to create a new Windows Phone 8 MonoGame project from the template and then just copy all the code in. MonoGame uses the exact same namespaces, it just has a lot of behind the scenes changes that make it reference different libraries. Applying these changes whilst also applying all the other ...


1

I think the issue is possibly a bug in the older versions of Windows Phone 8. The blend state seems to be borked so you need to create a custom one that you know works. private BlendState alphaBlend = new BlendState() { AlphaBlendFunction = BlendFunction.Add, AlphaDestinationBlend = Blend.InverseSourceAlpha, AlphaSourceBlend = Blend.One, ...


1

The recommended way seems to be scaling the sprites. You can create alternate images to handle differing resolutions and load them depending on the screen's resolution. MSDN Article


1

You're right on that main point: pixel collision is way complicated. Often times, it's going to be far, far more effort than it's worth. You'll likely have to program a form of collision that's not 100% the same as the visuals you draw. A rocket sounds like something that could very easily use rectangle collision detection. However, a random guess suggests ...


1

Try to delete the photo texture of the visual studio and try again it happened to me im using a .fbx format and work fine the first time ill try it it give me and error when it read the texture so I delete it and it work fine also make sure you export option in 3dmax. hope it work for you xD.


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