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The point projected onto the Start-End segment can be found using the dot product operator to perform a scalar projection: In your scenario, let's call \$P\$ the Point, \$S\$ the Start, and \$E\$ the End points. If \$P'\$ is the projection of \$P\$ onto the segment \$\overline{SE}\$, its length is: $$ \overline{SP'} = \overline{SP} \space cos \theta = \...


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Keep It Simple. We can simplify the problem by focusing in only one segment. Once we solved it for one segment, we do that for a set of segments. We can define a coordinate system for the segment that makes it easier to check the distance from the input. However, we still need to deal with how much of the segment has been painted. We could define a set of ...


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Below is some of the code I could get working. First I test for a collision with an object on the planet and use the [0,1,0] code. If there is no collision then I find the previous normal and use it to rotate. The forceAngle boolean orients the spaceship after it has had a collision and is only touching the planet. I am not sure why but I can't get the ...


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