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20

One way to choose texture sizes is to have a target texel density relative to the size of an object. For instance, if you wanted 128 texels per meter, then an object 4 meters in size should have a 512x512 texture, an object 8 meters in size should have a 1024x1024 texture, etc. The same guideline can be applied to tiling textures as well. Another thing to ...


13

Yes. The UDK is related to UE4 - The UDK is based off of Unreal Engine 3 to which Unreal Engine 4 is the successor. To the initial end user a number of things have changed. Unreal Engine 4 replaces UDK's Kismet Visual Scripting system with Blueprints. You can do practically everything with Blueprints and in some ways Blueprints can be considered a ...


9

No. From the faq link I put on @eBusiness's answer, in reference to what money requires the 25% royalty while using a comercial license: ...includes, but is not limited to, revenue earned from: sales, advertisements, sponsorships, endorsements, subscription fees, microtransactions, in-game item or service sales, rentals, pay-to-play, services you sell or ...


6

The default equation for attenuation f(x) = 1/( distance ^(exponent) ) from the images doesn't seem UDK is doing anything differently.


5

As you've spotted yourself, it's possible to use C++ within the UDK thanks to DLLBind. But there's no way you will be able to call engine functions from C++, you'll have to glue everything together using UnrealScript.


5

Non-commercial: ...refers to an activity or entity that does not in some sense involve commerce. An in-game shop involves commerce. If you make money directly from the game, it's a commercial game.


5

First of all, read the terms of free use for the desired product, they will usually contain a much more specific phrasing. It is hard to define a strict definition for what is commercial and what is non-commercial, a prominent borderline case is a good given out for free to promote a commercial product. It is still commercial, but what if the good doesn't ...


5

According to this link WHAT IS UDK? Unreal Development Kit was the free edition of Unreal Engine 3. It remains available for teams completing projects in UE3. Get UDK (February 2015 UDK). So you want to avoid using UDK and use Unreal Engine 4


3

You could create a subclass of PlayerInput with its own section with keybinds in the Input.ini. If the controls are different based solely on the map/GameInfo, you can make a subclass of your PlayerController, set its InputClass to your new PlayerInput subclass in defaultproperties, then in your GameInfo you can set PlayerControllerClass to your new ...


3

The answer is that you have to SetPhysics(PHYS_NONE) before basing it. Apparently this is not necessary if you are basing it on another descendant of KActor, since they will then be handled at the same time in the Tick cycle.


3

Current solution: local Vector ImpulseToApply, PointA, PointB; local GJKResult theResult; local DynamicSMActor TempActor; foreach Owner.TouchingActors(class'DynamicSMActor', TempActor) { theResult = QuadForceImpulseActor(Owner).CollisionComponent.ClosestPointOnComponentToComponent( TempActor.CollisionComponent, PointA, ...


3

If your game has high demands for server hardware/bandwidth you have a few options: Require players to pay to use your servers, either via monthly fees or a pay as you go system. Run the servers at a loss, if enough people continue to buy the game you can continue to run the servers. Run the servers with some form of advertising to offset the costs. Allow ...


3

Turns out that getting the difference between two vectors gives me a vector RELATIVE TO THE WORLD ORIGIN (DUHR) so that "arbitrary" spot on the map I was getting pushed to was just <0,0,0> + Unit Vector * ropeLength. In short: testPosition = Normal(testPosition - myController.TargetedHook.Location) * myController.TargetedHook.ropeLength; should ...


3

This was a comment, but it's really an answer. You're not going to get Quake 3's peculiarities in Unreal. Strafe jumping, grenade jumps, rocket jumps, etc. Here's me doing a combination grenade/rocket jump in Quake 3. That's not going to happen in Unreal unless you really mess around with how it works. https://youtube.com/watch?v=i6rqumD-9Hk It totally ...


2

That would be your DefaultInput.ini. If you add something along the lines of +Bindings=(Name="F4",Command="exit",Alt=True), that should do the trick. The next time you run the game, the UDKInput.ini will be rebuilt using a combination of DefaultInput.ini and the BaseInput.ini in Engine\Config.


2

According to UDN, the SRGB setting in the texture's properties has to be turned off (false) for normal maps and other textures that need exact values.


2

You can't make Kismet function in the sense that it will exists once in memory and can be called from several places at the same time. Every time you want to have the same piece of script, you must duplicate nodes. However, you can use sub-sequences to clean-up a bit your Kismet canvas. A sub-sequence is a single node into your main sequence, which contains ...


2

Is your game only going to be single-player, or are you planning to have multiple players? Since the attribute you are wanting to record is 'per player' (eg; one player greeting the bots does not mean all players have greeted the bots) - then this kind of variable should be stored in your playercontroller class. In a singleplayer game, it is quite acceptable ...


2

Killing Floor was created with the Unreal-2 engine, not the Unreal-3 engine (UDK), so you're kind of trying to export backwards. You're going to run into problems doing this - if it even works at all. Try copying it across in chunks. First select all the BSP (Right click on a BSP mesh and go Select All > Same Class), then copy and see if it will paste into ...


2

Are you using a dynamic light? If the light is completely static, I think all of the lighting information is going to be baked into the map, so it won't be modifiable at runtime. Also, you can try logging out the value of pointLight to make sure it's both valid, and the correct light actor.


2

With UDK, you have access to the whole UE3 kit, you will have to pay only when you start earning money. This means you have access to the deferred rendering. UDK provides access to the full UE3 feature set Source: http://www.unrealengine.com/files/downloads/Why_Independent_Developers_Turn_To_UDK.pdf It could be expensive, if you are making millions. But ...


2

As posted in your comment, the green frames are UnrealKismet references. Uncheck them from the Show menu to hide them.


2

To do the same as the Unity tutorial you mention, you need to use a Pawn (not a Character!) with your boat mesh. Then, use the SetupPlayerInputComponent function to get your inputs (or just your input node if you're using Bluprints). You can now AddMovementInput to your Pawn, and it should perfectly move. Your can use AddControllerYawInput to make your Boat ...


1

Just as a note, "show collision" only shows the default collision. You need to "nxvis collision" to show the physics collision. You'll notice if you scale at runtime the default collision scales, but the physics one stays at the initial value. I myself am struggling with this issue atm. I think the only hope is to remove the mesh (and physics) and re-add ...


1

Actually, UDK now has a "Combine Meshes" setting on the import settings, check that and you're probably ok.. I lose some materials once in a while, but then again, my UDK has shown some unheard-of problems, so it's probably just me. Another choice would be to combine them within the 3D editing program before exporting.


1

One way would be to have one building in your scene visible (hide everything else) Then convert one of the pieces into an editable poly - then click the box next to add, and pick all the pieces in the box. This will make one editable poly. I would recommend removing the xform and placing the pivot to the base of the building to help with importing. BUT ...


1

The simplest way would be to create a kismet sequence. Create some form of trigger mesh - or timer, that when triggered activates an animation on the skeletal mesh There is some great reference on the skeletal mesh pipeline as well as kismet on the UDN http://udn.epicgames.com/Three/VideoTutorials.html#Skeletal%20Mesh%20Pipeline%20-%20Using%20UDK


1

I can't give you an absolute solution to your problem, but here are some things that you can do to help narrow it down: Verify that the ground plane you made has proper collision settings. Alternatively, if it suits your needs, try using a landscape instead. (http://udn.epicgames.com/Three/LandscapeCreating.html) Verify that both systems' maps are using the ...


1

The EmitterPool is a manager class that you can use to spawn temporary emitters. You would do this by calling WorldInfo.MyEmitterPool.SpawnEmitter(...). For permanent emitters, you just need a ParticleSystemComponent variable in your actor set up basically exactly like you're doing. So the main problem is that EmitterPool is defined in such a way that you ...


1

Verify that the objects are actually touching (colliding) and not just passing through. You can do this by logging the touch and untouch events in unrealscript or via kismet. If they are passing through without touch firing, the collision properties of one or more of the actors needs adjusted accordingly to allow collision with each other. In unrealscript, ...


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