58

Microsoft has an FAQ about the use of their trademark. From that FAQ: Can I use a Microsoft logo to indicate that my product or service runs on or is compatible with a Microsoft technology or service? Yes, as long as you have a signed logo license agreement with Microsoft. Microsoft has many logo programs to indicate compatibility with ...


46

You should release. A trademark allows you to protect a name. You're more likely worried about your game, its concepts and art assets. You likely haven't spent a lot of time building up a brand, getting lots of following for your game, so people know it by name. If you had, you likely wouldn't be so worried about releasing without a trademark. However, don'...


16

First - IANAL - Want legal advice call a lawyer. Do you own a trademark on the name eyeRoller? My guess is no. There are two kinds of trademarks. One is a registered trademark. That is shown with an (R). And this means that you filed it with the uspto and obtained a registered mark. Then there is unregistered trademark which is shown with a TM. This ...


15

Usual disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and in this site questions about these issues have to be always taken as ideas, thoughts or experiences, never as technical advice. That said, it's good that in your question you use both the tags "copyright" and "trademark", because indeed your question in the end touches the difference between these two. I say that ...


14

There are different kinds of trademark, normal (™) and registered (®). Registering a trademark is overkill for most cases. Even huge studio's don't always do it. A normal trademark does not need a registration with an authority. So, just put a ™ after the name and you should (as far as I know) be fine.


10

Couldn't find the right phrase for search but finally found it, "using corporation trademark". It seems you are allowed to freely use their logo's and trademarks as long as the product is really compatible with their software. For Apple Compatibility: If you are a developer, you may show an image of an Apple product in your promotional/advertising ...


10

"Finding Dory" is a registered trademark by Disney Enterprises, Inc. You can look that up on the US Patent and Trademark Office. A trademark is also violated when you use a name which is so similar that one might confuse it with the trademark. Most people looking for a game about the movie might not remember if the name is written with y or i, so the ...


8

“Lucid” might or might not be ok for you to use. They may argue it may create confusion in users and send a cease & desist. Note: some companies may even send a cease & desist without a good case. Just because you may comply. Therefore, consult a lawyer. I will not even attempt to argue about trademark law in an international context. With that ...


8

Naming any business in the United States can be a drawn-out, expensive process. Oh, and IANAL. The very first thing, is that you are looking in the wrong place. You should be checking the trademark registry at the United States Patent and Trademark Office Website. There are a few things to consider is the class, multiple marks can exist with the same word ...


7

Absolutely not. Do not do this. A general rule of thumb, is that you should not use or reference any property that you do not exclusively own, e.g. you should not even be saying "This game is like a better Tetris!" or "This is a Super Mario Style Game!" The reason being, say your project that is about the DC character Batman is a complete failure, and it ...


7

First of all, I am not a lawyer, so I can not provide legal advise. When you are serious about this, do not rely on legal opinions of anonymous strangers on the Internet. Consult a real lawyer. There is never zero chance to get sued. You can get sued for anything. Companies sometimes sue people even if they know they can not win. They just do it to shut ...


6

Yes, you do require permission. Logos of corporations are usually trademarked, which means that they must not be used without explicit permission. Copyrights on the design of the logos also apply. You might wonder "Why would they sue me - I am making free advertising for them". Unfortunately advertising works two-sided. When you endorse another company by ...


6

No, it's not illegal to use words from another trademark. Police won't visit you, and you won't have to go to jail, even if you outright use the same trademark. However, holders of any trademark can decide to sue you, either to make you stop using the name, to make you give them a share of the income from the game, to make you acquire a license from them ...


6

While it is theoretically possible to end up with such an agreement (they sue and you negotiate this as a settlement), you should not bet on it. You obviously violated their copyright and their trademark. Why would they settle for a 50% split when they can sue for 100%, and then possibly damages and legal fees (beyond what you already have to pay for your ...


5

Having the same name is fine so long as they are obviously distinct entities with no intention of causing confusion for gain (and some kinds of trademark registrations can also cause problems). If the name immediately brings to mind the other product, you're probably asking for trouble; otherwise, it's just a coincidence. There are a number of books that ...


5

Short answer: you can use that name for your game legally, as long as you abide by the copyright laws and the name is not trademarked. For the long answer, we refer to Wikipedia: Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of works under copyright, infringing the copyright holder's "exclusive rights", such as the right to reproduce, distribute, ...


5

I do know if you happen to have an app available in the Mac App Store, iOS App Store, or Google Play, they have available banners at your disposal to post on your website. Microsoft used to have the Microsoft Compatibility logo available to Software Manufacturers that pass the hardware guidelines for said software. I know Apple is very meticulous about what ...


5

The option to remove the Unity logo from the splash screen is one of the perks of the paid tiers (Plus and Pro). So the simple answer is: pay for Unity, and you can use the built-in features to turn off the logo.


5

In the US, a trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, design, or combination thereof that helps consumers identify a particular product. If you register a trademark, you have legal grounds to prevent others from unpermitted use of your trademark with their product. For instance, Nintendo has trademarked Super Mario Bros. If someone attempted to market a game ...


4

First of all, if you're talking about the name of a company you're asking about trademarks, not copyrights. Second, as long as there aren't other companies with the same name in your industry (i.e. games), it's probably OK. I used to work at a game studio called Sucker Punch Productions; there's also a movie, an art/architecture magazine, a motorcycle ...


4

I suggest that you contact someone who is able to perform a trademark analysis of the name that you've chosen. It is important to know if the name you have chosen is protected in the corresponding trademark classes about 6-8 months before you launch the game. It is sometimes easy for the board members, investors or the owners to decide for a name that they ...


4

I think too much emphasis is made on legal use of trademark. The bottom line is that you may be sued for just about anything. The best way not to be sued is for your game not to become popular. If Minecraft was just as unsuccessful as the games it copied its gameplay from, then it would probably not have problems from Bethesdas paranoia. If you need legal ...


4

(I am not a lawyer, and this is definitely not legal advice.) The kind of laws and regulations you should look into are probably trademark law, as most of the time, the design, names, shapes, and other identifiable attributes are covered by registered marks. Contact a lawyer in that field and you could probably get some up-front evaluations of your ...


4

I'm not a lawyer, this is not a legal advice site. Opinions, here, are just that: opinions. To have a definitive answer, you should consult a lawyer. I know that under parody law [...] I would suggest to be cautious about it. To use that it's easier if you have an history of goofing around with various subjects. Microcraft could very well be interpreted ...


4

Another reason why this is not a good plan: think about the people. I doubt you have a lot of funds to make that game, and as @Philipp already pointed out, to make a game that DC would be ready to put their logo on, you need a lot of money. A lot of that money goes to paying people to make the game (salaries). To make a game of that scale, you'll need ...


4

Trademark law doesn't offer a yes/no answer in this case. Can they sue? Yes. Can they win? Yes. Will they sue? Only one way to find out. Will they win? Only one way to find out. Will it cost you money if they sue? Yes. Will it cost them money if they sue? Yes. Here's a case of how far some companies go to "protect" their trademarks. In my personal ...


4

First up: I am not a lawyer, and the following is not legal advice. For legal advice, you should always consult a lawyer. Drawing from Examples & Explanations for Intellectual Property by Stephen M. McJohn, there are multiple actions that might be considered infringement of a trademark, including: Implied Endorsement ...If a consumer sees a mark used in ...


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