9

It's a palette. Same thing you see some artists doing with colors. They draw a group of a couple of the main colors or even a gradient going between them for easy access. It's much easier to use a picker tool to select the next color than to go into the color picker wheel, fiddle around with it for a couple of minutes and pray it matches the rest of the ...


8

I don't know if there is a name, but this seems to be something you'd do to conserve memory. First, a basic tile is very low resolution - just a few pixels across. But when rendered, they are magnified 2x, 3x, 4x, etc. and are much more "blocky" on the screen. Next, older games will have a block of memory dedicated to screen display - what is in that ...


6

Here's one way to handle it: Make a texture that records which tile to draw at each cell of the grid, 1 pixel = 1 tile (so if you make a 4096 square texture, you can have over 16 million tiles in your map) Ensure it's stored uncompressed, with point filtering and no mipmaps Write a custom shader that reads this texture for each tile, then looks up the ...


5

Nowadays the most important reason to use a tilemap instead of separate pngs is just for organisation. Do you want a stage to have a different theme? Then you simply create a new tilemap, that follows the same rules as the previous one, but has a new appearence, and that's it! Compared to making so many separate new tiles, and have to point to them on each ...


5

Yes, they are more efficient. Depending on your specific hardware and driver, massively so. The basic idea is that you want to minimize state changes. Changing the active texture is a state change. In many cases the GPU can only handle rendering with a single state at at time. If you think of all the dozens/hundreds/thousands of shader cores that a GPU can ...


4

Sprite Sheets with a Uniform Grid The easiest form of sprite sheets, are sheets that use a uniform grid to lay out the individual sprites of your object. Your sheet is essentially a grid with a certain number of rows and columns of cells. Each cell contains a single sprite. Using a uniform grid, means that all cells have the exact same dimensions. ...


3

Here's a little experiment you can do yourself to see why using a texture atlas (or tileset) is a good idea. The goal is to draw a checker pattern using a white.png texture and a black.png texture. The result should turn out something like this: First, load your two textures into the game: _black = Content.Load<Texture2D>("black"); _white = Content....


2

From my understanding, PIXI doesn't recognize the blue walls. Your blue walls are really just one big rectangle (a sprite), so you can detect collisions between your characters and the map itself, but not individual walls within the map. A better approach would be to draw your walls using PIXI's graphics primitives (as lines). Then you'll have the ...


2

This tileset is famous because it was used in RPG maker VX. It seemingly consists of 6 tiles (2 by 3) and it even outputs tiles in that size, but it actually handles the tileset as if it was 4 by 6: You can then create every tile combination you need (which is 48 in most cases, source here, see the "The blob" section) For instance, creating a tile, that ...


2

Yes, using texture atlases is more efficient than using individual images. It largely boils down to two things: The images have to be transferred onto the GPU in order to be drawn to the screen. Sending one large image is going to generally be faster than sending a ton of small images. State changes on the GPU are expensive, and switching textures is a ...


2

This is one of "truths of old days" and no longer important (that much important). While using one texture is definitely more efficient(switching texture, as every operation, introduces some overhead), on today's hardware is not that big difference and the extra performance is generally not needed. If you have hardware capable of rendering millions textured ...


2

Sloped terrain is hard to do in a convincing way in an orthogonal 2d tilemap. But here is an example from the 1993 SNES game Illusion of Gaia by Enix which does a quite decent attempt: This ramp uses 3 tiles: What techniques are at use here? The diagonal cliff tiles provide a perspective hint The floor texture is darker than the one used for level ground....


2

If you have the height of each corner you can easily find which tile to use. For example on the following drawing, the tile number 1 has hills on its top corner and left corner. The tile number 2 has a hill on its left corner. To know which tile to use you would write something like that : if (top_corner_height == LOW && bottom_corner_height == ...


1

Thanks to @DMGregory, i've Added the parametter samplerState on SpriteBatch.Begin that fixed everything SpriteBatch.Begin(transformMatrix: DisplayOffsetMatrix, samplerState: SamplerState.PointClamp);


1

It comes down to performance. Tilesets are good for the engine, since it then has to only store one single path to one picture. And that picture is easily made into power of two to better be compressable and decompressable, reducing the size of your built game.


1

The simplest way possible to perform a collision detection is checking the next position an object should move to: if there is a free place, move it, if there is a wall, don't move it, etc. Simple implementation: // get tile at position function getTileAt(x, y) { var gridX = Math.floor(x / 36); var gridY = Math.floor(y / 36); return mapArray[...


1

The downloaded file contains a big spritesheet with many sprites in it. What is the best way to find out what settings I need to have in Tiled to work with these? The spritesheet included in that download is not directly usable in Tiled currently, because the images are not aligned to a grid. Rather there is an XML file describing the locations of each tile,...


1

Some notes from the comments: Using Nintendo's official art work (ripping it and using it) is definitely a violation of copyright. (Your response was you're only using it for yourself.) Questions about "help me rip ... from game ..." are probably off-topic for this site. What I really recommend, like your link, is to use custom tiles which other people ...


1

It looks like RPG Maker VX is overly restrictive with this when compared to other versions, and there is no out-of-the-box way to do it. However, there are at least community-made scripts, such as SwapXT, that allow you to work around the limitation.


1

These are "Auto Tiles" for the RPGMaker game engine. While the map editor uses 32x32 tiles as a basic logic unit, the engine actually splits the tiles into 16x16 tiles. The map editor then automatically uses the sub-tiles to generate the fitting transitions. This allows the mapper to draw with just one material while the map editor automatically creates the ...


1

Take a look at TILED. http://www.mapeditor.org/ It's a tool for creating 2D tile maps including HEX-based maps like the example in your post. Phaser allows you to load tile map data generated by this tool. Once you've created and exported your map you would do something like this in your preload script: this.game.load.tilemap('SweetTileMap', '/images/...


1

Your question is a bit unclear, but I assume you are asking: Why render the world of a 2D game using a single texture holding an indexable tileset instead of having the world pre-rendered from said tiles? What is the advantage to building the image of the world at runtime? There are many advantages to this. Firstly you are right that less memory ...


1

It's simply more convenient. If you store the tiles with ids, then you can easily convert those to coordinates on the texture, so you don't need to store the textures in an array or use switches. You also don't need to rebind the textures if you use an API like OpenGL or DirectX, and you only need a single reference for the textures instead of multiple ones. ...


1

Think of the hole tiles as "teleporters" which teleport the player-character to a different map (the one representing the layer below it). You will likely already have an implementation for these to implement doors and other gateways between maps. The only difference between a door of a building leading to an indoor map and a hole leading to the dungeon map ...


1

I don't know what tool you are working with but as if you work in unity like me, you can make a trigger for those holes and certainly player has a collider. so in collision stay of hole or player just write a code that checks the tag of other. if the distance was less than a threshold write the code for falling.


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