69

Most software development teams (not just in game development) solve this issue using version control software. Examples are Subversion Git Mercurial Microsoft Team Foundation Server Perforce All these tools have some differences, but the basic workflow is usually like this: There is one central repository for the project with the complete codebase. When a ...


16

A useful mechanic is to provide each player with only a part of the solution. This works especially well if certain classes can have information others don have. For example there could be a sort of "seer" class that can get information about the enemies that other players cannot. This means that the other players in order to succeed must have information ...


12

When you want players to chat with each other, you need to make sure that communication is rewarded and not punished. When a player passes information via chat and as a result wins the game, this is a reward, and the player will communicate more often. When a player passes information and they get nothing from it, they will not communicate this information ...


9

In addition to the points raised in the other answers about version control and handling conflicts with merges, there are at least two other ways that team members can avoid overwriting each other's work: Some version control systems (e.g. SVN) allow locking of files. This means that one team member can take exclusive ownership of a file for some length of ...


5

As you express the desire to generate "closeness" I think it's important that the communication come with an emotional tone. Dry, business like communication, such as is promoted in tactical cooperation, doesn't always have the same method of generating closeness. Consider how close you feel to colleagues at college/work and how that changes depending on ...


4

In order to get players to communicate with each others, we must first understand why players communicate in the first place. People do not communicate for fun1, they communicate to share information. And here we have reached the essence of the problem, information. Players are much more likely to communicate when information is necessary to progress. ...


3

Name it in a way that will be obvious to anyone reading it. If you are going to have alot of classes for Objects, perhaps have something like companyname.gamename.objects, all your game logic-related classes could go in companyname.gamename.gamelogic It doesnt really matter what you call the classes or the namespaces, but having a system that you can take a ...


3

I'd like to examine two multiplayer class-based FPS games with support classes as case studies: Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory and Team Fortress 2. Both have separate classes that give health and ammo, and I think it's helpful to consider both types of support. Enemy Territory has three support functions - healing, reviving and ammo - given by two classes - ...


3

There are a few better ways to get players to share ammo, however your your example mechanisms wouldn't work that well, example 1 has the weakness of not really giving any reason towards player B has no reason the disperse ammo and therefor might not decide to share him ammo at all, example 2 can either be used for some really annoying grieving and could ...


3

I want to point out a system that existed in one of my favorite shooter games, Battlefield 2142. Now, there's a lot of cross-over between BF 2142 and BF 2, so a lot of this applies to both, but I'll focus on BF 2142. Battlefield, overall, had a system called the "Comma Rose", which, simply put, was a 'rose' of commands you could pop up on-screen, select ...


2

Job titles and responsibilities vary greatly from one place to the next. The duties for a particular role at a particular place depend on what the two relevant parties have agreed upon. The particulars of that (such as authority of a manager to assign additional responsibilities, legal ramifications, and so forth) extend beyond the bounds of game development....


2

Try it - or not. There is no recipe for success. Everyone's different. Every team is different. If it works, great! If it doesn't work, then at least you'll learn from the experience.


1

In the long term you will not get around taking some financial risks. When your project becomes a failure, separating your personal financial future from that of your company will allow you to sleep much better at night. The exact laws which govern limited companies differ drastically between different countries. That means a definite answer is not possible ...


1

Maybe you had messed up using collab at the first time. Collab is really simillar to git. Initiallize, update diff, merge conflicts... You'll get along to it. I suggest you to reset the collab, as it have been a long time from last work. This article should help. Also, take a look at the manual of Unity Collaborate.


1

So if I got your question correct, you don't want to open Unity but write the scripts that would work on it? You CAN but you might not be sure about what you've written since it can not be tested without opening Unity. You might even solve syntax errors using intellisense (Visual Studio have intellisense for these) but if there's any logical error, ...


1

I'd say that the answer to this evolves depending on where exactly you are in the game development process. If you're just starting out and are trying to figure out the mood and style of a game, perhaps you would spend more time allowing the composer to experiment, bouncing their music to inspire your concept artists' and writers' work and vice versa. ...


1

I think it's going to vary from composer to composer really. And whether you are giving them wide creative freedom to compose, or are restricting them by asking for a very specific style or sound. It's like asking a 3D artist to create something for you. You might be very vague and just say, "I want the content to convey the idea of great age and decay"...


1

I am assuming that you are talking in terms of a first-person shooter game. In this case, I have a suggestion that may be a little bold: Show the player's teammates his/her location and orientation. In a first person-shooter game, when someone encounters an enemy, they try to move into places that are covered from that enemy, an most certainly will be ...


1

It depends on many factors so this answer will have to be rather vague. There's also almost nothing Unity specific in your situation. First off, there are several completely different ways to use Unity, and most of them are equally right. You will have to find a way all teammates agree with. Regarding tools, source control is mandatory. If you know about ...


1

What can be done with many engines out of the box is to: Settle down the heightmap for the whole world, as you usually cannot split this one up easily Use layers to divide the entities into well encapsulated sets (e.g. road network, buildings of city1, buildings of city2, npcs of city1, ...) and save layers in separate files (CryEngine does that, other ...


1

If players could benefit greatly from "closeness" in xp they are more likely to want it. An example would be allowing players to preform powerful combo attacks (that require two classes).. for instance one player has a long recharge "spill slippery oil on the ground" attack that makes monsters slip and fall while another has a magical fire arrow attack. ...


1

Require players to coordinate different tasks at the same time in order to encourage them to communicate. For example, let's say you want players to kill two bosses in order to open a gate to continue. The first team just has to kill boss A and then kill boss B on a linear path to open the gate. That team probably won't have to communicate in order to ...


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