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specular lighting of directional light more area has specular lighting when camera is far from an object Yep, looks right to me. The specular area for directional lights is supposed to be more or less constant w.r.t. the camera, given the same reflection surface. To compare, we can look at the phenomenon known as sunglint, which is basically specular ...


19

Physically-Based Rendering You're on the right track when you say "it tries to mimic how light reflects in real life, which is it usually gets split to two components, specular and diffuse depending on the type of material." But we've been modelling materials with specular and diffuse in games & computer graphics for a long time. The trick is that we ...


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This is called mipmaping, It looks like you are missing out on mipmaping for your textures. this causes a huge impact on visuals. And when it comes to mipmaping Normals, Specular and other "information" textures, it gets quite tricky. the reason for this is that when objects gets further away, the gpu has to take this into account and calculate the ...


3

The specular highlight (labelled "specular" on the pictures you provided) is an specular reflection of the light source. It happens where the rays from the light source are reflected directly - with little or not scattering - into the camera. For reflection, how light is scattered depends on: The material. In particular, how rough or smooth the ...


2

First of all, the angle of the incident light is the same for every point The angle between the incident light and the normal is different. Even if the incident light comes form the same direction※, the normal is different for each point of the surface of the object. ※: In reality this would be an approximation admisible for a light source very far away. ...


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I've found a cheap solution in an article by Christian Schüler, where he posted a shader code used in Velvet Assassin. He smothes highlight by limiting maximum gloss to the surface curvature, which is computed by ddx and ddy of world-space normalized normals. It produces amazing results, maybe not so in noice reduction but in temporal stability of highlights ...


1

A few things come to mind, and I will be making an assumption or 2. Firstly, your out_colour obviously produces the top image without adding specular? That just adding specular in causes it to be overly dark. The other thing you should also do is call saturate on your out_colour also. Could you confirm that just removing specular from the link float4 ...


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This is a dirty little secret for metallic lighting: it's all about the reflections. Every good looking metallic render is actually reflecting from a complex environment. This goes for other reflective materials too, like glass and water. From http://www.pauldebevec.com/Probes/ Take for example the above scene. The reflective spheres all use the same ...


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They are not really related. This document from Marmoset explains PBR well without invoking lots of math. Screen space reflections on the other hand is a post-process screen-space technique used to render real-time reflections. It is generally much cheaper than rendering cube maps each frame, but can look less accurate and doesn't allow off-screen objects ...


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It's not quite as simple as simply tinting the specular color with albedo for metals. For metals the albedo is used to define specular reflectance at normal incidence, but this color goes to white at grazing angles due to Fresnel effect. You can use Schlick's approximation for this computation.


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Short version: a) 0.5/0.5/0.5 In the metals workflow, the specular colour will be exactly as sampled in the Albedo map. It's possible with PBR to have some metals shinier than others (while of course still obeying conservation of energy), which can only be achieved by allowing dimmer colours in the Albedo Map to result in dimmer specular values.


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