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193

That is a common concept in nearly all existing videogames: you either say yes to accept a new quest or no to not take it. Players get used to this pattern by encountering it over and over, and finally simply start to assume beforehand that this pattern is also true for your game. A good example of handling this problem is Deus Ex: Human Revolution. In the ...


130

It's common for games to have multiple overlapping loops of gameplay and reward, hitting different frequencies and motivation types, so that we don't have all our eggs in one basket, motivationally speaking. This helps the game appeal to more players, and more consistently appeal to any one player, since every player is a multifaceted human being with a ...


128

Change the options to Left-Right rather than Yes-No. A Yes-No choice is an option. Add this extra bit in or ignore it. A Left-Right choice is a choice. You can have this or that, but not both. So instead of having a single character offer an option, have two characters offer conflicting paths. Make it clear that either way the play will miss out on some ...


116

It's not as easy as saying: "Lesbian couple in the game = ± x% copies sold". Just like with most things in game development, it's not the idea which matters, but the execution. When you write LGBT characters into your game, there are many things which can go wrong: You can portray them as ridiculous clichés, offending LGBT people and LGBT allies. A common ...


93

As Charanor and Philipp point out in other comments & answers, there is a school of thought in game design (called "Love the Player" in my studio) that says if the player wants to do something that doesn't break the game for other players, err on the side of letting them do it. Players who see a kidnapping twist coming and strategically prepare for it ...


67

I come from a place in the Internet most people deem to be horrible in every single way. While I generally don't agree with most of the stuff said in that website, I can provide some insight on what happens around there when a pro-LGBT game is released. A small but very vocal group of (probable) trolls will complain about it, no matter the way they are ...


43

A way to show which answer is the "right one" without taking away the choice, would be to weight the options through meta-information. Instead of just showing one "yes" option and one "no" option you can provide a list of options for the side you prefer. For example: No. You're going to get yourself killed. No. We don't have time for that. No. That would ...


39

I have some numbers, though they're for a web game, which might not apply to your market. Back in 2012, I wrote a game called Farm & Grow. It featured little people wandering around a farm and occasionally one of them would get married. The game made no distinction regarding gender; I was writing for a game jam and didn't really have time, but also ...


38

In any game where you have character leveling, you need to decide on a power curve. This is a mathematical function which maps game progress to character strength. This curve can be linear, polynomial or even exponential. The flatter the curve, the less progress your player will feel, but the easier it is to balance because early-game content still stays ...


38

It appears that you came up with an array of stats first, and now try to figure out what those stats could be doing. I think you might be approaching this problem from the wrong direction. The way I would approach the design of an RPG combat system is: How do I want the core gameplay loop to feel? Do characters attack each other? How many hits does it take ...


35

You want to start with an asymptotic function. That is, one that starts at a number a and approaches another number b, but never actually reaches it. It's probably going to be easiest if a = 0 and b = 1. You'll take this equation, input the number of stat points (Luck points) the character has, and get the actual stat value (Crit Chance) as the output. A ...


31

One quick way to get key-value pairs in Unity's inspector is to define a serializable entry class, and then use an array or List<> of them. eg... public class SpellAnimationMap : ScriptableObject { [System.Serializable] public class SpellAnimationEntry { public Spell spell; public AnimationClip animation; } public ...


31

Reduce the players sight-range. You can do that by adding an overlay mask on top of the rendered scene. This simulates the reduced sight-radius of the player-characters due to darkness. It forces the player to concentrate on a very small section of the screen giving a feeling of claustrophobia. But keep in mind that it disorients the player, so cut the ...


30

There's no such thing as bad PR. While not universally true, it certainly does apply to indy games with a rather low projected number of sales. This kind of controversy is the best thing that could happen to you, because it's free advertising, spreading the name of your game. Which is also the sole reason that Beauty and the Beast story you linked exists. ...


29

There are multiple design constraints, each of which can be solved independently. It's up to you to decide how to solve each one, in a way that makes sense for your game. [I want to discourage] meta-gaming/save-scumming The Quality of Life solution would be to automatically strip the companion's gear. Breaking immersion If the departure was voluntary,...


25

The reason turtling is attractive in this case is because there's no or little incentive to do anything risky during the character's downtime. It's not risk-reward, it's wait-reward. To counter this, you have to incentivize risk. The periods of burst should be buffered with active preparation for their next explosive turn. There's plenty of ways to do this, ...


23

It's a matter of motivating the player. The player has an achievable goal to work towards The player sees how far away from the goal they are The player sees how playing the game visibly progresses them towards the goal Variable ratio rewards can also be a great motivator, but so is an "honest pay for honest work" game mechanic where the reward after each ...


22

Games sell because they're good, not because they have X or Y Your game sales will most likely have nothing to do with the sexual orientation of your characters. What will matter to the players is how developed the characters are and how realistic they feel. If you make a character that is (insert some stereotypical LGBT character here) then you will most ...


22

I love these because there's always a multitude of ways to do this. The first thing that comes to mind is to not make it such a blind choice. If it is a decision that has the potential to ruin a perfect ending, perhaps it's worth making the "no" choice look like a "yes" choice. Something like: Hey, I think we should go do this ridiculous thing that will ...


20

Use per-tile lighting to do sight-range reduction. Shadowlands (1992) - 3 light levels: Diablo (1997) - 8 light levels: You can do much more with this dynamic, such as easily having monsters only spawn on dark tiles, have light streaming out of doorways and windows, etc. To induce claustrophobia beyond just lighting, have a look at the way the Maggot Lair ...


20

The problems you have with calculating DPS from that formula are because what you call BaseDamage doesn't actually seem to be that. Assuming that all numbers are positive, BaseDamage / ( BaseDamage + Defense ) will always resolve to a floating point number somewhere between 1 and 0. It doesn't matter if you have 10 BaseDamage, 1,000 BaseDamage or 1,000,000 ...


19

This behavior is completely understandable. After all, nobody wants to lose an irreplaceable item forever because they made the mistake of having it on the wrong character at the wrong time. There are several solutions I could think of: Instead of fighting against your player's drive to optimize the fun out of your game, just give them what they want. When ...


17

You're on the right track. The gist of the client-server networking model is that a server is that it's a central point of knowledge that clients connect to. A game server typically contains an in-memory world representation, a list of connected players, a game loop (with e.g. player control handler, a physics engine & AI). You'll also need a ...


15

Why don't we constantly steal and murder in the real world? We have empathy with other people and don't want them to feel bad. We are afraid of getting caught and punished. Why do games often fail to convey these hinderances to committing crimes? Creating empathy There are actually quite a lot of games which manage to create empathy for NPCs, but ...


14

When you want one hit with 200% attack to be exactly equal to 20 hits with 10% attack, then your only option is to make defense a percent value. When the defender has 55% defense vs. physical damage, then the total amount of physical damage they receive is reduced to 45%, no matter how large or small the portions in which it gets dished out. However, ...


13

However, at some point you want to revisit one of the first places just to chill there .. and all the enemies are just .. meh. Of course, that's how it is, but in my opinion not how it should be There's a few ways games address the issue of "early levels become trivial when you return to them" One is to have a few world-altering events that globally make ...


12

Generally, when you start without experience you should go with the existing solution instead of inventing something new. However, your situation is different. Neither FATE nor GURPS are frameworks that are designed for browser based RPGs. So the question is about adapting them, not about using them. Adapting an existing tabletop system for an online RPG is ...


11

@Philipp gave a great answer. Another concept to take into consideration is the idea of average threat level. It is perfectly acceptable for certain foes to have stats dramatically greater than what your curve predicts – so long as their other stats are lowered in proportion to the increase. For instance take pixies armed with envenomed needles. They are ...


11

I find your argument for the Option-less version very compelling, but lacks the insight, why a player would choose the easier option. As your play tester stated, they feared they might miss on content: XP, items, quests... What that means is, you have to show the players what their options really are. On way could be the direct way. Tell them directly ...


11

Answered per @trlkly's comment suggestion: You are presenting a "yes vs no" dichotomy to your players. A lot of the time, this is fine; players regularly run into scenarios where they have to make a choice and there are immediate consequences for that choice. This does not appear to be one of those times. In this scenario, you've got a companion who wants ...


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