9

My question is why are there not more games which take this approach of a game economy tied directly to real money? I think the answer lies in what a game is. To most people, a game is something where you relax and can have carefree fun. Some people will have more fun if game money is real money, but others will have less fun. So inherently it seems ...


8

When you allow players to not just pay you money but also get out money, your game can easily fulfill the definitions of both banking and gambling which are both heavily regulated in many jurisdictions. While some game companies might feel comfortable with managing a gambling business, very few possess the know-how which is necessary for operating a bank in ...


6

There are four kinds of games I could imagine where human players wouldn't get outpaced by bots. Embrace the bots. Make a game about bot programming. Let the best bot-writer win. It's not cheating when it's the point of the game :) (Ok, this is kind of a cop-out) Create a very complex strategy game with large numbers of units to control, a large number of ...


3

Note that Diablo 3 had the real-money auction house. (before it was removed) How it worked: Players could purchase in-game digital items from other players using real money. There was a similar, but separate, auction house doing the same thing using in-game gold. The items are sold similar to how many MMOs have some version of an "auction house". A small ...


2

Your game has to have some form of income to make it work - it has to make money so you can give money away. Assuming your goal is to make YOU some money... Base your game concept around the idea that even if a bot is playing, it's still making you money. More money than the bots are being paid. Done right, you only care about bots upsetting other human ...


2

Yes you can; nothing is stopping you from giving other people your money. The question is do you want to? This reminds me of the "aardwolf" secret in Wolfenstein 3D. The game was released with a secret message, "Call Apogee and say Aardwolf". This was planned as a contest; the first player to follow those instructions would win a prize. However Apogee (the ...


2

While other answers are thorough in possible reasons, it is worth addressing the alternate: Not all games forbid real-world trading. World of Warcraft and Lord of the Rings Online are two examples where the economy has been changed to allow player's to acquire in-game currency with real-world currency. In these cases, the developers enforce using game time ...


1

It's not easy, and its feasibility depends on your technical ability and funds. It also depends on the game itself. e.g. if it's a game of pure chance, writing a bot won't help at all. But if it's a game of speed, then obviously a bot will trump any human. It's perfectly possible though, there are hundreds of online casinos and poker sites, all of these ...


1

Come up with a game that is too hard to write a bot for. For the vast majority of games out there, the investment of writing a bot is vastly higher than the prize you could get for winning it. For most professional e-sports, bots simply aren't good enough to compete with capable humans. (We're getting there, though. Then, this question will become relevant ...


1

When the game currency is nonconvertible, the company can freely give it away. If "game$ 1" costs US$ 1 and a in-game competition gives a player game$ 100, that player will think "Wow, I just earned US$ 100", even if they cannot actually get the money out of the system. Of course, the game money shouldn't be TOO freely given away or nobody spend real money ...


1

Are players getting items based on skill and chance, but the chance is driving outcome, which is possible to convert to back to real funds? Then it is Gambling. Forbidden in many countries (noticeably USA, except Nevada) or strongly regulated. Regulations bring noticeable cost and makes your target audience 18+ or 21+. So totally not worthy return of ...


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