28

A publisher would not be able to protect you from someone else creating a more popular clone of your game. Games from large publishers get ripped off just as often as those from small indies. Maybe the publisher has enough money in their war chest to fight a legal battle, but considering that such lawsuits are expensive and the success rate is hard to ...


17

Steam only deals with downloadable games, not browser games, so you'll need to package your game using something like nw.js or Electron. Also you might want this library for integrating with Steamworks. (note that the question you linked is about Java, not JavaScript, so the technical details are very different. if only I had a nickel for every person who ...


14

If it's a good idea or not is up to you. And the success of the strategy depends on what your actual goal is. No Time to Explain did this way back in 2011. They uploaded a special version of the game to Pirate Bay that had all the characters wearing pirate hats. “We thought it’d be funny to leak a pirate version ourselves which is literally all about ...


13

Even though hacking the APK seems easy but it will definitely not run, the other option I believe is to upgrade to the Unity Pro version and I found on some research onto it. See links: Answer from the Unity 3D page Forums Documents about splash screen


10

The completeness of the work depends on the publisher, the game, you and the relationship you have with that publisher. Each publisher will have their own standards for what's complete enough. Further, those standards could be tighter or less restrictive depending on the relationship you have with them. If you've never spoken to them, and they don't know ...


10

You are required to supply information in the sections marked with a grey checkmark (now a grey triangle with exclamation mark), in all required fields (marked with a blue asterisk). This includes, but isn't restricted to: Pricing and Distribution: setting app availability to all countries (don't worry about this, read on), configuring presence of ads and ...


7

There are three areas that you must take care of: Copyright Patents Trademarks Even if you break something, you might get away with it. The company legal department can contact you and ask you nicely to remove the infringement. Or they can directly sue you, especially when the company is making profit by holding and licensing patents. Copyright Every ...


6

The current (2/21/2017), general process as described on the Greenlight FAQ: Who should submit their games to Steam Greenlight? Is there another way to submit my game to Steam? Steam Greenlight has replaced our previous submission process. Any developer or publisher who is new to Steam and interested in submitting their game to the platform should ...


6

The current operating system stats on Steam tell us that only 35% of Steam users even use Windows 10. And of those who do use Windows 10, not everyone regularly use the Windows store to shop for new games. This might be a kind of chicken/egg problem. There aren't many interesting games on the Windows store, so nobody goes there to look for games, so nobody ...


5

Just throwing an app into an app store (however it is called on your platform) and waiting for people to download it is not enough to have a game take off. The usual user behavior is to either listen to recommendations from off-store resources (friends, websites, social media etc...) or just browse the top sellers and top-rated games in different categories. ...


5

You can perform a whois search to see if and when a domain got registred. helloneighbor.com is taken since 2002 and gunpoint.com since 1996. The names were not available for the games which came much later, so they had to be creative in their domain choices. When it comes to domain names, short and generic is usually better than long and specific. But if ...


5

The option to remove the Unity logo from the splash screen is one of the perks of the paid tiers (Plus and Pro). So the simple answer is: pay for Unity, and you can use the built-in features to turn off the logo.


5

The standard Unity .gitignore file shows what files and folders should not be committed to git and can therefore be deleted. # This .gitignore file should be placed at the root of your Unity project directory # # Get latest from https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Unity.gitignore # /[Ll]ibrary/ /[Tt]emp/ /[Oo]bj/ /[Bb]uild/ /[Bb]uilds/ /[Ll]ogs/ ...


4

The final shipped game generally looks better than the earliest footage, but our audiences aren't always sensitive to that when evaluating early peeks at a game. These lines aren't legal protection so much as a gesture to temper the "this game looks like shit" reaction. By overlaying it on the frame, they ensure that if any secondary source - like a video ...


4

XNA things aren't in the prerequisites list for me either. Instead of that, go to the same location and click "Application Files", then make sure the Publish Status of the XNA libraries are set to "Prerequisite". To demonstrate, here's a screenshot of my settings for a new XNA project. (Click image for full size.)


4

I am not a lawyer, and this is not a legal advice site. To get a final opinion, hire a lawyer. There are 2 aspects in your question: Can I use the City of New York without doing copyright infringement? Can I use Google Street View and related to build the city? The City of New York The name of geographic locations cannot be trademarked, so the name of ...


4

If you are already on Steam as a publisher, then you can post other games after a short evaluation by them. In the past (before Greenlight) you could enter by personally asking them. A contract was custom made for you and off you went. Once Greenlight started, that option ceased to exist and the only way to accept new publishers is that option.


4

First, you need to clarify what you mean by publish locally: What services are you providing to the license holder? Why should they choose you over others (possibly even themselves) for the services provided? What do you want in return for your services? If you can't give clear, compelling answers to the above, you're unlikely to make progress. Next, ...


4

To be sure you need to check the license for each asset to see if you have any legal restriction - most free assets I have seen have no such restriction, but some do require crediting, others are free for demo purposes only. Regrettably this isn't enough to be 100% certain, at one point 7 Days to Die was taken off Steam for using an asset that they'd ...


3

You own the rights if you created it (source code and media content). As long as you don't have an existing contracts for work you create (sometimes tech companies will do this while you're employed with them, if the work is similar to the work you do there), what you create is yours. Also ensure the software and hardware you're using does not claim any ...


3

Ask Microsoft/Sony. It's not about what the law considers an US company, it's about their interpretation of what an US company is. They make their own rules here. Sony says that you must be physically located in the Americas, so a post-box is unlikely to statisfy their requirements. Maybe you could get away with a staffed American publishing office which "...


3

If you are referring to your in-game fonts, you do not need to install the custom fonts in order to use them with your compiled game. When compiled, your fonts get converted to .XNB files, which are packaged in in your /bin directory and are used to draw in game.


3

For your first game, I would suggest self-publishing. If you get enough publicity and attention, you can do very well. It is viable to contact a publisher, though, if your game looks good and has good playing/replay value. Some effective ways to market, if you self-publish: Write articles for gaming sites, such as indiedb.com, gamedev.net, etc Submit demos ...


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