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20

Depends on the game and the people making it. There are common sources for nearly any product being created, games aren't that different, but the below are tailored slightly more towards games: Publisher: A company that partners with a development studio to create a game. This is very much like an investor below, but the publisher will typically have ...


4

It's definetly free, but it runs only on windows, which is not. Visual studio is optional, but it is the preferred editor by many developers, especially in professional game development studios. You will also find most samples for it as a Visual studio solution.


3

The question is "how much are your customers willing to pay"? This depends on how your game compares to the current competition. Players usually don't pay more than one subscription at a time, so you can only demand more than the average market rate when your game is objectively better. This consumer behavior is quite different than with one-time-payment ...


2

Really the solution here is playtesting with follow up questionnaires. From each tester, ensure you collect: How long each level takes to complete How many levels they play How well they rate the game play How much they think a fair price is Then just crunch the numbers and find averages. With this data you can get fair price per hour played (along with ...


1

Some players value the price they'll pay for a game the way you just explained: how much does it cost and how long will I play, how much $ per hour? But that's not the only way you should take to price your game. How is the competition pricing theirs? How much will it cost you to create, publish and market the game? How many copies do you expect to sell? ...


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