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How much do you believe in the open source idea? When you are not 100% committed to the free software philosophy, then there are some interesting variants: Release the client under an open source license, but not the server. Any private servers will have to write their own server software. That software will always be behind yours feature-wise, so those who ...


4

Choosing a good heuristic is the hardest part of applying A* in novel situations. Fortunately, it can be fairly forgiving. The "null heuristic" float HeuristicRemainingCost(Node node) { return 0.0f; } ...still gives the correct least-cost path in the end. It just falls back on Dijkstra-like behaviour, searching all paths in order of cost ...


3

When developing games, gameplay considerations usually trump realism. Also, there are technical limitations and development resource constraints which limit what you can reasonably achieve. For these reasons, even the largest open world games still condense cities down a lot. Landmarks and zones are usually far closer together than would be reasonable in ...


3

GIS systems actually use polygons for this kind of information, where each "ring" is a list of coordinates, so you can take the same approach. Once your borders are defined in a list of points, you can triangulate them, assign vertex colors, or even apply UV values in order to apply a texture. Then the same mechanics apply as with a 3D model. Polygons are ...


2

Am I correct in assuming that I should be periodically recalculating the highest priority goal and switching to the highest priority goal if it's different than the existing goal? Yes. If you have an agent with multiple goals, you need to keep their priorities updated, and make sure the agent is on the highest priority one. Am I correct that when a new ...


2

If it's simple enough that you can do so, You should play it out on paper. Even if it's complicated, with multiple distances, stances, cover, hit locations, what-have-you, you should see if there are any obvious pitfalls, and doing it with pen and paper is probably the fastest way. Run a combat scenario with your battle idea and see how it goes. Sure, ...


2

Disclaimer: I do find the other answer from Philipp to be excellent I approach this from a much different point of view. I'm going to focus on Magic The Gathering: Online (Mtgo) Mtgo is something with many (illegal) free competitors. First, it is illegal not because of the client/server, but the assets that are under copyright and the game rules itself (I ...


2

Depends on development methodology the fast answer is "When you have enough information to begin writing code". My thinking on what "enough" should be is something like ... I wont be rewriting large portions later. What i'm writing is a small enough chunk that i can handle it as a "task". I see so many people taking on tasks like "build the terrain" ... ...


2

One of the options is to kind of make it a second game. If you make the "normal job" aspect as complex, complete and balanced as your "adventurer" part (so that it is fun), it will appeal to players. Have a leveling system, upgrade the buildings, buy more land, buy the competitors, make deals with the Crown or with other towns, go shady and kill the ...


2

Why not both? Not all adventurers have to be nomads. Going out for adventures and coming home again is a good cycle of excitement and newness with comfort and familiarity. Of course this is difficult if the economics of the craft are such that you have to do it full time or not at all, but that's something you as the designer can decide. Furthermore, ...


1

Don't think players will neglect building aspects in favor of combat. Wealth building and customization can actually be a super fun game mechanic, and if balanced right, you could get just as many players willing to focus on it as you would have players focused on combat. Some good examples of this are Rune Factory and Stardew Valley. A couple things I ...


1

Consider this: most players play videogames to escape reality and experience the thrill of adventure. That said, it's safe to assume many, if not most of your players would opt for combat over normal life because that's what they came for: an adventure. Think of it this way: the "normal lifestyle" in your game should be as exciting as combat to capture the ...


1

best way to create something realistic is to take your time and simulate the evolution from the original settlement. It'll also create some historical background for the city. You can look for historical maps of cities of the type you want to create. Track the changes and try and reason why they happened and if you need something similar to yours. City ...


1

I usually write systems for pen-and-paper RPGs, so bear that in mind when reading this. The Feel First, I look at what kind of experience I want to create. Is there something I want to emulate? What sort of pace to I want to keep? How punishing should mistakes be? Should a lot of it be up to luck? You don't need (or want?) hard numbers here, but an ...


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