134

Yes, you should care about Let's Players. In fact, you should make your game as appealing to them as possible. Reach out to them and encourage them to play your game. Let's Players have become one of the most important marketing channels for independent game developers. They are a great way to expose your game to a large and interested audience and most of ...


91

This is my own personal opinon on the subject, and some other people may dislike microtransactions for other reasons, but hopefully this will give you a first element of answer. I personally dislike microtransactions because they are not honest and up front with the customer. They are often associated with psychological tricks to make you spend money. One ...


55

Back in the day when apps were $1-$2 (or the occasional $5 or so for something above and beyond or very specialized) I bought quite a lot of apps. Buying an app and then having full control over the game play is terrific. Now that apps have gone to free download + microtransactions, I have stopped paying for anything completely. Why pay to play is ...


44

People hate scams and price increases, and have been taught to associate micro-transactions with both. In some cases, especially most of the early cases, micro-transactions were used for illegal scams. There was a time when Apple and Google ignored the password requirement for payments, under some conditions, which was used to prey on children and (other) ...


27

I would go a bit further than what Eldy said (+1) and quote this additional bit from a Rolling Stone article on the matter: A free-to-play game does not sell its in-game currency or items; it doesn’t sell anything, in fact. It holds hostage the one thing that is obviously more valuable than money. They hold hostage your time in this world [...] You still ...


27

Because it’s nickle-‘n-diming, nothing else. Just imagine you go to Disney, and pay 20$ to get in the park, and while you walk along, every some yards there is a turnstyle, where you need to pay another 4.99$ to pass. You have no idea how many more are coming, and either you pay them all, or you turn around and wasted all the money you already paid. Would ...


22

I had a similar experience to the one you describe with some other game I will not mention, and ended up thinking about it in similar terms as you do. As Bálint says, it is a double edged sword. Yet that does not mean you cannot get ahead. What happens when they play the game for an online audience, then that audience gets to know the game. If this were ...


21

You'll need to setup a test account and then publish your build as a draft application in order to successfully test purchases and the workflow as a normal user would. This is what Google has to say on the matter of test accounts: The Google Play Developer Console lets you set up one or more test accounts. A test account is a regular Google account that ...


19

Players don't care about the economics of game production cost. I spent all my Saturdays and some Sundays for 6 months to make one of my games. A friend, when presented with having to pay $3 for it, said that I owed him a beer for buying it. No, he got a game that I worked hard to make. Players don't want to pay for a game, no matter how cheap. Many, many ...


18

First of all you obviously need a game that people would want to play. Without that, no matter what you offer you will likely not get much support. So lets assume you have such a game and now you want to attract people. Looking at the most successful game projects on Kickstarter (like Torment: Tides of Numenera or Planetary Annihilation) you will see a ...


15

There are quite a few resources to refer to. First thing to note is that 93% of the top 100 grossing games use in-app purchasing so that by itself means something. Here is a research by flurry showing the dominance of in-app purchase dominance as a monetization model for mobile games. This is from about a year ago and the trend became stronger since: Part ...


14

The cost is not entirely known up-front Let's compare against two other monetization models; Players are all too happy to shell out $60 for a triple-A title that has decent reviews - because they understand the cost that it will incur to them. They feel like they can appropriately weigh the cost against the reviews (and their preferences) to decide if they ...


14

As a hobby game designer, I have an especially deep hatred for microtransaction for a reason that I think many players also understand instinctively: If your game has microtransactions as its business model, it most likely means that your game design has been mutilated to maximize the profit. That means progress will be artificially slowed so that people ...


12

It's not the microtransactions per se that are hated. It's the hate-able game designs and the way the sale items are designed, which happen to use microtransactions. For example: Microtransactions for advantages, creating pay-to-win games where players are essentially in an endless bidding war with each other, and/or free players are at a huge ...


10

If you're not using Google Play's tools as in Josh's answer (although, I recommend you do use those tools). You'd have to manage this information yourself. You would want to avoid storing something locally on the user's device. Users don't want to have to pay to remove ads per device or per install. You need to maintain a database with users who have paid....


10

How much do you believe in the open source idea? When you are not 100% committed to the free software philosophy, then there are some interesting variants: Release the client under an open source license, but not the server. Any private servers will have to write their own server software. That software will always be behind yours feature-wise, so those who ...


9

You shouldn't do that if Google notices that you are spoofing a country (and they will) then your accounts will be banned and you can't create another one. This might lead to an app deletion by the Google team as the only legal way to do in-app purchases is Wallet / official Google api. You only get paid for clicks not for impressions. I have about 1 Cent ...


9

My question is why are there not more games which take this approach of a game economy tied directly to real money? I think the answer lies in what a game is. To most people, a game is something where you relax and can have carefree fun. Some people will have more fun if game money is real money, but others will have less fun. So inherently it seems ...


9

Microtransactions are not universally hated Having a game or aspects of an otherwise fun game altered invasively simply to sell more microtransactions is what is universally hated. I think a list of games and give a short evaluation of each on how I personally feel about microtransactions in each would help show which games to them well and which do not ...


9

I think fundimentally it is because it is a business model which no longer emphasises making the best possible game (or even the best game with the limited available budget). Look at these businesses models: Paid up front: Further revenue is driven by reviews and positive recommendations, providing a very good game drives this Paid by advertising: The ...


8

There are arguments to both options. Single Currency - usually simpler for players to understand Multiple Currencies - allows more flexibility to in future optimizations For a single player action game I don't think you need more than two. Three of four currencies is something that is usually reserved for resource management games where you actually gain ...


8

When you allow players to not just pay you money but also get out money, your game can easily fulfill the definitions of both banking and gambling which are both heavily regulated in many jurisdictions. While some game companies might feel comfortable with managing a gambling business, very few possess the know-how which is necessary for operating a bank in ...


8

How can I monetize this game? Traditionally, there are four methods to monetize an MMO: Buy the game, play forever. In this model you will get a lot of capital on release, but then you won't have a constant cash flow anymore. But if you want to keep the servers running and the community happy, then you will need some regular income. That means you will ...


6

I've made some reasearch on few game projects in Kickstarter. I have picked smaller projects on purpose, something doable in few people, or in a single person. These are all recently successfuly funded projects. I haven't found any successfuly funded projects that don't offer the digital copy, so I picked a project that as one of its goal has to release the ...


6

Apple provides a framework for in-app purchasing in StoreKit. You can read the docs on it here. From their documentation: Store Kit communicates with the App Store on behalf of your application. Your application uses Store Kit to receive localized information from the App Store about products you want to offer in your application. Your application ...


6

Here's a slightly different take on the matter: Of the users who would bother to crack your game's data format or decompile it and change it, how many do you think are actually willing to pay for these things? In other words, if these users were to try and fail to cheat your game, do you think they would then give up and pay you money for the items? ...


6

That's certainly a legitimate approach, how successful it will be is another matter. This article is about an iOS game called Gasketball that took a similar approach and how that worked out for them (spoiler: not so great). Based on this article I don't think players are enraged by the idea of getting a free-to-play game then paying some amount of money to ...


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