91

This is my own personal opinon on the subject, and some other people may dislike microtransactions for other reasons, but hopefully this will give you a first element of answer. I personally dislike microtransactions because they are not honest and up front with the customer. They are often associated with psychological tricks to make you spend money. One ...


55

Back in the day when apps were $1-$2 (or the occasional $5 or so for something above and beyond or very specialized) I bought quite a lot of apps. Buying an app and then having full control over the game play is terrific. Now that apps have gone to free download + microtransactions, I have stopped paying for anything completely. Why pay to play is ...


44

People hate scams and price increases, and have been taught to associate micro-transactions with both. In some cases, especially most of the early cases, micro-transactions were used for illegal scams. There was a time when Apple and Google ignored the password requirement for payments, under some conditions, which was used to prey on children and (other) ...


27

Because it’s nickle-‘n-diming, nothing else. Just imagine you go to Disney, and pay 20$ to get in the park, and while you walk along, every some yards there is a turnstyle, where you need to pay another 4.99$ to pass. You have no idea how many more are coming, and either you pay them all, or you turn around and wasted all the money you already paid. Would ...


27

I would go a bit further than what Eldy said (+1) and quote this additional bit from a Rolling Stone article on the matter: A free-to-play game does not sell its in-game currency or items; it doesn’t sell anything, in fact. It holds hostage the one thing that is obviously more valuable than money. They hold hostage your time in this world [...] You still ...


19

Players don't care about the economics of game production cost. I spent all my Saturdays and some Sundays for 6 months to make one of my games. A friend, when presented with having to pay $3 for it, said that I owed him a beer for buying it. No, he got a game that I worked hard to make. Players don't want to pay for a game, no matter how cheap. Many, many ...


14

As a hobby game designer, I have an especially deep hatred for microtransaction for a reason that I think many players also understand instinctively: If your game has microtransactions as its business model, it most likely means that your game design has been mutilated to maximize the profit. That means progress will be artificially slowed so that people ...


14

The cost is not entirely known up-front Let's compare against two other monetization models; Players are all too happy to shell out $60 for a triple-A title that has decent reviews - because they understand the cost that it will incur to them. They feel like they can appropriately weigh the cost against the reviews (and their preferences) to decide if they ...


12

It's not the microtransactions per se that are hated. It's the hate-able game designs and the way the sale items are designed, which happen to use microtransactions. For example: Microtransactions for advantages, creating pay-to-win games where players are essentially in an endless bidding war with each other, and/or free players are at a huge ...


9

I think fundimentally it is because it is a business model which no longer emphasises making the best possible game (or even the best game with the limited available budget). Look at these businesses models: Paid up front: Further revenue is driven by reviews and positive recommendations, providing a very good game drives this Paid by advertising: The ...


9

Microtransactions are not universally hated Having a game or aspects of an otherwise fun game altered invasively simply to sell more microtransactions is what is universally hated. I think a list of games and give a short evaluation of each on how I personally feel about microtransactions in each would help show which games to them well and which do not ...


4

The biggest problem with micro-transactions is that they are, in general but also in some very prominent examples (which people remember well), deceptive, fraudulent, abusive, and explicitly designed to take advantage of the weak. Insofar, they are also massively unethical. That, and they're not "micro" at all. How are they deceptive and fraudulent? The ...


4

We have to differentiate between micro-transactions which buy content, from those which buy consumables. In the beginning, micro-transactions were not only cheap (around $1 or not much more), but they bought content. New levels, new characters, new missions, new hats. Even if it was just decorative, if you bought it, you kept it. It was yours. Now, most ...


4

Let's look at the definitions: microtransaction: a very small financial transaction conducted online. DLC: additional content created for a released video game. Expansion pack: a separate product that builds on top of an existing game to add significant new features. (usually disc based) Basically, microtransactions don't make the games bigger, they simply ...


3

You could try these plugins, they are both free. http://project.soom.la/ https://github.com/onepf/OpenIAB/tree/master/unity_plugin


3

I came across an open source resource that simplifies in-app billing on Android. Take a look at http://soom.la. They also have a reference app that shows you how to use it. Here is the sample app on Github I'm using Unity, they also provide a free plugin on the Unity Asset Store: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/en/#!/content/6103.


2

I can offer two reasons. One is that old style gamers such as myself just prefer to play the game without having to pay extra to get the content. I would prefer to unlock content by player. The second is worse, its the game companies that appeal to children and constantly try to sell items to them that have zero value , sometimes for reletively large ...


1

It all depends how you implement the server-side code. If, for example, when the user logs in, they send the number of currency they collected while offline, and the server accepts that currency without any check, there's a huge potential for people to abuse that (assuming they have some programming skills, and they care enough). One thing you can do, is ...


1

First of all, the microtransaction model of monetization is based around a few premises. It lends itself to games that are long, or continuous in nature, where players will come back for multiple sessions over a period of time. Arena games where you enter and exit a match several times in one sitting, or games with many stages that unlock in succession. A ...


1

There is one point for hating micro transactions that I didn't see made here. tl;dr players feel like people who pay get an unfair advantage. Players in games often feel like people who pay have an unfair advantage. In clash of clans and clash Royale there exists the slang term "gemmer" which has a negative connotation, referring to people who pay ...


1

Why not integrate Google Checkout? It's XML based and posts data using HTTPS, which, if your going for cross-compatibility, would work in Android too. :)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible