9

When you put all languages in one file, no two translators can work with the same map at the same time, because there will be edit conflicts. You also have to train your translators how to edit your level files. XML might seem intuitive to a programmer, but to a non-technical person it isn't. But when you use a string file for each language, all translators ...


9

Localizing a game correctly is damn hard. You can browse the internet, read blog posts, or StackOverflow answers; you can learn the traditional i18n frameworks such as gettext; read Wikipedia pages on internationaliztaion and game localization; consult the excellent Microsoft language guide – but localizing games is actually harder than that. In fact,...


6

I would create a directory containing language text files. The directory could look like this: en.txt 0 "Start game" 1 "Load game" 2 "Enable cannons" 3 "Join server" 4 "Kill the enemy" fr.txt 0 "Démarrer le jeu" 1 "Load game" 2 "Activer canons" 3 "Rejoignez serveur" 4 "Tuer l'ennemi" de.txt 0 "Spiel starten" 1 "Spiel laden" 2 "Enable Kanonen" ...


6

My preferred elegant solution is this: The English text in any file (or whatever your base language might be) must be passed through a translation function before display. The gist is that your string table(s) consist of the English version of the string followed by the localised version(s) of the string, and your translation function takes the english ...


6

People might not translate because they think the follow things, that as noted is the comments may or may-not be true. Translation costs lots of money to pay to have done Take lots of support time if done via user supplied text Takes lots of developer resource to implement For free games that rely on Ad revenue, ad clicks are most likely near zero in non-...


6

I'm using the freetype library (http://www.freetype.org/) to load glyphs from freetype fonts and then use bin packing to generate a glyph texture/atlas during runtime, similar to how freetype-gl does it (https://code.google.com/p/freetype-gl/). When the game is initialized, I generate a glyph atlas with the printable characters from the ASCII range. This ...


5

In the games I've worked on, we restricted the subset of characters used for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean (together referred to as CJK) to only those required to display the text in the game. In other words, we didn't attempt to cram in every possible character; we just took the database of CJK text from our localization teams, did a pass over it to find ...


4

If you want to do it the old-fashioned way, then yes, you can use it in a grid. But if you want to use any kind of variable or half-width characters, like writing 5 instead of 5, then you'll need to get off the grid. The characters are all the same width anyway so if you're not using any non-Asian characters then it should align by itself. I don't think ...


4

The program is trying to convert a unicode wide character format into a standard ascii format. The code you are trying to convert is out of the available ASCII format range. http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/444/index.htm This is the code you are trying to convert, and ASCII only supports 128 different values, with extended ASCII supporting 256. ...


4

As always, there are lots of ways to achieve what you want. However, unlike other applications, games have very specific requirements, so what works best for other programs may not be best for a specific game. Remember that localization is a very complicated matter. It's not just about translating words and meanings. There are lots of subtle meanings in ...


3

Color symbolism in non-Western cultures (and even among Western cultures) is definitely incongruent. However, with regards to video games, typical Western and Japanese color symbolism is pretty universal; in other words even if a culture uses different colors for a given mood or theme, in a video game, it won't seem jarring to follow Western or Japanese ...


3

Localization systems I've seen generally work in a "pull" approach, rather than a "push". ie. instead of pushing out a change to all text in the game when the player changes the language, instead each text field pulls-in its text when it's time to be displayed. How it might look in Unity is you could have a LocalizedText component on the GameObjects that ...


2

Solved. Way to get correct non ASCII code : event = pygame.event.poll() if event.type == KEYDOWN: print(event.unicode)


2

Another explanation would be that most mobile games have a quite intuitive gameplay and require less text to be read by the player so most players are able to enjoy the game even if they have moderate english skills. In these cases, translating the game isn't really worth it for reasons already mentioned by Simeon Pilgrim.


2

Perhaps it's because most people who have access to these technologies speak english nowadays, at least good enough to understand what's going on. I'd rather have a good game with more features rather than one translated in my native language. It wont really affect my decision on which game I'll choose.


2

Try open-source visual novels. The writing is typically rough around the edges, but there is plenty of it. Such games are frequently translated by fans. (Watch out, contents may be, uh, steamy.) If they're made in Ren'Py, a Python-based VN engine (many are) then their dialogue will be findable in human-readable form in the distribution. Juniper's Knot, for ...


2

A patent is invalid when whatever it does has already been done by a different product before the patent was handed in. This is called prior art. This patent is from 2008. What you describe (loading localization from external files) has already been done by GNU gettext, first released in 1995. So when that would be the claim the patent covers, it would be ...


2

To expand on Cedric's answer you should try these steps to make sore that the encoding is correct: Make sure that the properties file uses the correct encoding. It might help to delete and re-create the file in some cases. Make sure that the I18NBundle object uses the correct encoding. You do this by supplying the encoding when loading the bundle into the ...


2

It is not important if all the text is just standard video-game english words like 'Play', 'Levels', etc. 1) The stores themselves don't care at all, at least not Google Play which is the only one I have published to. Google Play automatically translates the store page of your app using Google Translate to the language of the user if you don't provide ...


2

I finally found two answers : First one, I didn't get that DirectInput Key Codes are called ScanCode. So with that in mind there is this answer wich is linked . So the use of MapVirtualKeyEx translate my Scan Code into VirtualCode and I choose the my UI asset with that code. The other mean will be to create juste the background of UI asset without any ...


1

Apparently this is because of the font I'm using. It doesn't support some of the characters used in other languages. The answer to my question on UE4's answer hub has more details.


1

It depends of your OS : If you are running on OS X you can use Interface Builder to create your own launcher interface. If you are on Windows you will have to create a special configuration so that your game launches automatically without having a launcher window. If you really want to change the buttons text and design you could also use some software ...


1

The patent refers to the specific library they have developed to solve this problem not the idea of having such a system. You literally cant patent a idea. So if you code your own localization and don't steal that specific code you are good to go. I personally made a simple system that read a google doc, downloads it into XML form and then replace a bunch of ...


1

Disclaimer: The following might be a bit biased, since I'm both a native German player as well as (professional) video game translator. So, sorry for that. But I think I might be able to provide you some insights. I'm not trying to sell you anything. :) Want to know what got me into this business? Being annoyed by bad translations in my favorite game(s) and ...


1

Apart from technical issues, that's something you get to choose for yourself. There are lots of games/programs that use each of those approaches, so you have to ask yourself what gives a better UX for your users. In my opinion: Choose system language: This is my preferred choice. I dare say the vast majority of users use and expect this. Those who want a ...


1

It will vary from game to game. Some games will have this information easily accessible in human readable data files, other games will have it stored in binary data packages. This is something you'll just have to poke around and find yourself depending on which game you're interested in. Either by looking through the data files yourself, or searching online ...


1

This is how I usually add multi-language support to my applications. Presume u have a list of words/expressions u are using in your game, list them in file(in english). Then add the translation of the required language and make such a file for every language. Default/English language file the only weird file because the key(left word )and translation ...


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