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7

In order to get a server list, you will need a central matchmaking server to which all game-servers connect and announce that they are online and to which all game-clients connect to obtain the list of currently online servers. How many servers are you going to have? For comparison, I remember that during the high-times of the original Counter Strike, the ...


5

The essence of the "host advantage" is having a low ping (round trip time to the server). If you are the server, you'd have no ping time, but even being really close to the server would result in a small ping and still have a large "host advantage", so I'm just going to call it a "low ping advantage" instead. It really depends on the game and how the ...


3

If it's for windows, you could host with either http://en.softonic.com/windows/games or http://www.bluesnap.com/ecommerce/sellers/digital-sales/sell-games Both are solutions that will get you users and will also take care of payment.


2

I once calculated the cost of buying a server and hosting it at home vs. renting an equivalent one from a cloud hoster for a couple years. I came to the conclusion that the hoster was in fact cheaper. Some things you might forget to account for: The hoster pays the electricity bill, which is not negligible for a server which runs 24/7. When any parts of the ...


1

In fact, you could use unity as a client programming. Meaning totally as a game client distribute to players. Elsewhere the game clients connect to any kind of game server written with other platform and other programming language. For example a game server written in .net offering Rest API interface. Or maybe a nodejs server offering socket.io / websocket . ...


1

You have answered your own question. Unity charges you for two things: Licensing their engine, proportional to your number of seats (employees in your organization using the software simultaneously), once your revenue exceeds a particular threshold. Use of Unity's online services, proportional to your consumption of those services. If you are not ...


1

This is what I know about Servers. I have my own Server, but never cared about single Application hosting. There also could be other possibilities. It is not important that it's C++. It is important, for which operating system you compile it. There are good chances, that your server code could be platform independent. (Did you use any Windows libraries?) ...


1

If it's just simple offline browser games that don't require any kind of interaction with a server, you can use github pages. You can easily set up a "demo" branch containing all your dependencies (if you didn't commit them into the project in the first place). This has the added benefit of making it easy for your potential employers to check your source ...


1

It depends a lot on what minimum requirements you want to have for your game, the worst case scenario would be dial-up modems, unfortunately they can only handle 33.6 kbit/s or 4.2kB/s in upload speed (they could still probably play the game as a non-host however). Looking at the state of internet report from Akami Technologies you can see that the average ...


1

50'000 bytes per second is absolutely reasonable for PC game. You might have issues with number of packets though, knowing RTS games design, you should wrap packets in bundles (as discussed in your previous questions).


1

For simple matchmaking only, you can create an ASP.Net or PHP website that the players login to (via your game app) and push a notification when they create a server. The problem is securing the server to make sure only your players are accessing critical services like advertising a host or requesting the available host list. There are also services like ...


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