247

First make a white-on-black mask of your logo/text and blur it. Then create a repeating (tileable) solid noise texture (GIMP used here) Use the Map->Tile... filter to create a 3x3 tiled pattern (in this example, 128x128 x 3 = 384x384) for the next step to ensure our texture is still repeatable - we'll keep only the center part. Use Blur->Motion Blur... to ...


170

Masking To make this effect, you can mask objects by using a stencil Buffer. the stencil buffer is a general purpose buffer that allows you to store an additional 8bit integer (i.e. a value from 0-255) for each pixel drawn to the screen. Just as shaders calculate RGB values to determine the colour of pixels on the screen, and z values for the depth of ...


103

Pyramid Particle Unity default particle's shape is quad. first you need to change this shape to pyramid by using pyramid object or turns quads to pyramids with a geometry shader. Refraction To making broken glass effect(Refraction) you can use GrabPass { "TextureName" } that will grab screen contents into a texture. GrabPass is a special pass type - it ...


30

A general outline: Create a depth map of your scene without the shield. You can get this effectively for free, since transparent objects are often rendered in a later pass anyway. Otherwise, you can create the depth map by rendering the scene sans shield onto an RTT with a depth shader. Render your scene normally, pass the depth map to your shield shader. ...


25

Use an animated texture.* There are some good ones in the store for < $10. Add a Halo. You can use the particle system, or just a transparent glow texture on a billboard in front of the sun with a script to re-position the texture when the camera moves. This hides the aliased edges of the sphere model, allowing you to use a lower poly model, and looks ...


21

You could easily do this with a particle system and a shader. Set up the particle system to release 1 particle every X milliseconds with a max of 3 particles. (Choose an X based on how far apart you want the trailing sprites to be.) For the particle, use the same image as the character's current sprite, but with a different material. Try some of the alpha ...


13

I would recommend an alternative approach: the rapidly exploring random tree (RRT). One cool thing about it is you can get it to go around corners, or explode in all directions. The algorithm is really basic: // Returns a random tree containing the start and the goal. // Grows the tree for a maximum number of iterations. Tree RRT(Node start, Node goal, int ...


12

There are two easy ways to solve this. What minecraft does is use a pseudo ambient occlusion. This essentially creates a shadow around ledges, making them visible from any angle. It can even highlight the edges with the plainest blocks in the game: If you want to implement this, there's a nice tutorial about it here. You can basically make any corner ...


10

Other then the particale system and halo effects Vadim mentioned you could create your own shader effect. There is some introduction to shaders for Unity and the possibilities are endless.


9

Since you dismiss the particles I assume that you mean the self-illumination map. The basic is that you start with a texture that has the glow in it. But of course the shader has no way of knowing that the glowing part should not be made darker by the shader. So you need to mask off the glowing bits like this: So now in the shader you factor in the glow ...


8

The problem is that the image effect grab the current screen after render. Since your camera render directly to backbuffer (they only clear depth), the image effect is apply to everything. Solution can be : Setup a Camera first that clear to a transparent color, with a setup RenderTarget (you can create it by script so it is the same size as your screen) ...


7

This can be implemented as a post-processing kind of effect. (When using Unity/XNA/Dx/OGL/...) Geometry method Start by creating a mesh that resembles the distortion effect you are looking to achieve. (e.g. model a half cylinder (or cone, sphere, cube, ...), make sure to set the texture coordinates). Render your 2D game as usual, but render the final result ...


7

I was about to start an answer going over splines, but realized there was probably already a pretty good explanation in the internet. And here it is. The relevant steps are 1 and 2 (3 isn't directly applicable) The gist of it is: Every so many frames, record where the player is: The key here is to make sure you're recording the ...


6

Sounds like vignetting effect. You can easily accomplish this with a shader.


6

Creating the glitchy look can be accomplished in a broad spectrum of ways. In essence, what we have been culturally accustomed to accept as a glitch is everything that is a sudden distortion of what would otherwise be coherent content. Some glitches fit well with analogue transmission (i.e white noise) and others fit well with digital displays, random ascii ...


6

You can do this with magic (shader)! Secret: Cutting Assistant In Half Of course, we know she is never actually cut in half. So, there has to be some logical explanation for it all. Well, he certainly relies on the help of an assistant alright. But it’s not one – he has two of them! https://www.editorchoice.com/magic-tricks-revealed/ as you see in ...


6

Here's an example of how we can mimic this appearance in a Unity scene: My strategy is: First, compose the image that the POV display is trying to project. Render that image, with a shader filter that adds artifacts that look like a POV display. On the left is step 1. I've positioned some sprites representing my clock face and hands. That way it's easy ...


5

The simplest way to get such an effect is to literally blink the sprite: Just don't draw it half the time. var frequency = 200; if (! blinking || Math.floor(Date.now() / frequency) % 2) { ctx.drawImage(...); } The idea is that when blinking is set to true, the sprite will flash at the given frequency.


5

It's just using the depth map. It renders the world then renders the shield and takes a difference between the shield's rendered z value and the depth buffer z value to tint the pixel more white.


5

Create a new particle system In the general settings: "Start Lifetime" reduce a lot. The lower, the lower the length of the particle trail. In my example I am using 0.2. "Start Speed" to 0, so the particles don't move from where they were created. "Simulation Space" to "World" so the particles don't move when the parent moves "Emission": Controls the ...


5

This will depend a lot on the specific effect you're trying to achieve. As one example, here's a pair of fire effects created by Edward del Villar. The one on the left uses particles, while the one on the right is a LineRenderer with a custom shader: Because the version on the right is rendering on a continuous ribbon of geometry provided by the ...


5

It appears you want Blink to be executed as a coroutine. But you are executing it directly. If you call an IEnumerator method directly, you receive an IEnumerator object which you could then use to run that method from one yield return statement to the next by repeatedly calling MoveNext() on it. That means you could, if you wouldn't discard that ...


4

Define a vector that shifts the rendered position of everything. When that vector is (0,0), the screen is still. Changing it randomly every 5-10 frames causes the screen to shake. You can smooth this change if you like.


4

You can implement the clipping plane functionality using vertex and fragment shaders and using discard fragment. The other option is described in this paper, where it introduces a technique that modifies the projection matrix so the near and far planes are re-positioned to become a general purpose clipping plane. This way you can implement that without ...


4

There's particle effects, global fog and custom shader effects such as volumetric fog. A few helpful links are below: http://docs.unity3d.com/Documentation/Components/script-GlobalFog.html http://www.gamedev.net/blog/633/entry-2254758-volumetric-objects-in-unity/ http://docs.unity3d.com/Documentation/Components/SL-Fog.html http://forum.unity3d.com/threads/...


4

I use the following method in a 3D scene for grass and vegetation animation, but is easily transformed to 2D geometry. The method is as simple as offsetting vertices of wind-affected geometry by some sine fuction. (vertex shader code follows) float3 wind = sin(time+(pos.x+pos.y+pos.z)*0.1f)*wind_direction.xyz*wind_strength; pos+=wind; Here time is a shader ...


4

Just like the particle system solution, you can use 2dtoolkit to create the same effect. Add 3 children game object to the character with only a sprite attached to them. Change the alpha and coloring as needed. Then you can vary the sprite's local positions depending on the speed of the character: myTransform.localPosition = characterSpeed * distanceFactor;...


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