4

No, the user does not walk around while using VR. That would be extremely dangerous as your are effectively blind to your real-world surroundings. You could stub your toe on your coffee table, or fall off a cliff, depending where you are. VR relies on some sort of stationary controller. Whether it be keyboard and mouse, PlayStation controller, or Kinect ...


3

When clicking ✕ (close), your Unity app should get an escape key press notification & you should be able to handle it the same way as an actual key down event. For example, to quit, you would do this: void Update(){ if(Input.GetKeyDown(KeyCode.Escape)){ // close icon pressed, place appropriate code here Application.Quit(); } } There was an ...


3

The unity build process only builds stuff in the included set of scenes that you add through the build configuration dialog ... https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/BuildSettings.html ... after selecting your desired set of scenes and the build platform you want to build for you can start the build by clicking the appropriate button. So in short ... Adding ...


2

Most games get around the problem of you hitting wall in VR by teleporting you around. This is usually done in such a way that the player can push a button to teleport where they are looking. The easiest way to implement this would be to use the button on top of the Cardboard to trigger a touch event. This event would send a raycast and teleport you to the ...


1

This is actually a very common scenario, it may be less recognizable because you have custom hardware. The more commonly recognized scenario is a wireless input controller, like an XBox controller. An XBox controller sends and receives data. It tells an application that a button is being pressed, and an application tells it to vibrate. Your custom hardware ...


1

Found a workable solution: developing a Daydream/Cardboard App using Instant Preview (https://developers.google.com/vr/tools/instant-preview) allows Unity / Unreal Applications to be rendered locally on the desktop and be streamed over to the smartphone. This is good enough for prototyping.


1

In first person mode, where the user is moving themselves by looking around, the reticle is always in the center of the screen. So you can just as easily move forward to achieve the same effect. Either with a straight constant movement: void Update() { this.transform.Translate(transform.forward * Time.deltaTime); } or do a Raycast to ensure the player ...


1

It's not clear if the problem is with your source code, but it could actually be an issue with how your scene is arranged. If you want to move the GameObject the GvrViewer script is attached to, you need to create a parent object, and move the parent object instead. The GvrViewer script has functionality for changing its position and rotation based on the "...


1

With previous versions on Google VR SDK, you added a prefab called GvrViewerMain to the scene to get a stereoscopic camera. The GvrEditorEmulator prefab has replaced GvrViewerMain in 1.50+. The preview in Unity will not appear as stereoscopic, but it will be stereoscopic when built for Android. Check out the release notes for Google VR SDK 1.50 for more ...


1

Here is some code that you should apply to the camera in a .cs script. Then you will be able to move around just by looking. using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; public class controller : MonoBehaviour { private bool walking = false; private Vector3 spawnPoint; private void Start() { spawnPoint = transform.position; } ...


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