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12

Rim lighting. http://blog.wolfire.com/2009/09/character-rim-lighting/ Basically you increase the brightness of a surface the more the tangent is pointing away from the camera.


7

Looks to me to either be the Fresnel Falloff shader effect or some variant of a Rim Lighting. The pixels near the edges appear to be just brightened. You can see a similar effect described here.


4

You can't use the emmisive property alone, that will simply cause the object to appear. If this is something you are positive you want (And realize that it may affect your FPS, especially if you have a large number of these objects), I would use a combination of two techniques: Use the emissive property. This will make the object appear lit even in a dark ...


4

Use sprites textured with glow textures, with an additive blend. The additive blend is crucial here. This is how most glowing effects are achieved. Additive is the synthesis of lights, actually. You don't need an alpha mask for textures used with an additive blend. The RGB mask is used as the alpha layer, where black is fully translucent and white fully ...


2

Glow textures are nothing special. He's just using a glow-like texture (in fact, look at the comments, the author describes it as a gradient.) The magic behind the actual glow is not the texture but the blending of it into the scene. In this case, additive blending should do the trick (check for examples here at GDSE) although he describes he uses max ...


2

To make a shader that only draws when occluded by other geometry, use ZTest Greater. To always draw, use ZTest Always. Ensure your shader is late in the render queue. The glow itself is a different problem, personally I like rim lighting effects for such things - like inner glow rather than outer glow.


2

Yes, you should try implementing it the way you suggest. Another way would be to create the animated ray in an art program. Export it to a sprite sheet and just use a textured quad to display the animation where you need it. That would be very efficient.


2

This is generic solution that will work even with FFP: Sort models from far to near (in the example this is just a matter of 2 planes) Set blending to additive. Render opaque outline; Render half-transparent insides; Render outlines with half-transparent fading gradient; Render glowing dots sprites on the corners.


2

Another cheaper solution would be to fake glowing by using static semi-transparent glow textures instead of creating the glowing effect through post process shaders. You would then need to animate their transparency (and/or size) in order to achieve a pulsing effect similar to the Nexus logo. An advantage to this approach is that you can use your favorite ...


2

In order to do a glow or bloom, you generally need to start with an image, threshold it and possibly colorize it, then blur it and add the blurred version to the original. I would do this by creating a few textures and FBOs for multiple passes. Something like this pseudocode: Create an FBO Attach a texture to it to draw into Draw a textured quad with your ...


2

As you said, the way "most people suggest" to implement bloom is via postprocessing. It's clear from your question that you're somewhat aware of postprocessing's limitations. Extend the glow to unlimited distance, and your GPU will grind to a halt. On the other hand, you will hit the edge of the screenspace eventually, so "unlimited" is a misnomer. ...


1

For mirror like ground create a material with standard Shader make the metallic value to 1 and smoothness to 0.5 and attach it to the ground which will make object like a mirror. Now for the glowing objects create another material with standard Shader and then enable emission for material and then attach material to the model. for more info please follow ...


1

You don't outline directly on the object itself, but do the outline in a post process step. Draw the scene, as if there was no outline. Draw the object(s) you want outlined to a new screensized texture. Apply the outline shader you already use to combine the images. You may want to change the shader, so it draw the outline to the screen, without drawing ...


1

You could look at projecting your texture (decal) onto a surface. Wolfire have a good blog post to get started on decal projection here.


1

As Namek says, one way is to bind the overlay texture and do the adding yourself in the pixel shader. Alternatively, re-render the geometry that contains the glyphs using additive blending and bind the overlay textures instead of the regular ones. Depth test should be enabled, depth writes should be off, and you would need to add a small depth bias to ...


1

To render just the edges of an arbitrary polygon you could use a Solid Wireframe technique. It uses barycentric coordinates to determine which edges to draw. For example you might have a triangle whose barycentric coordinates are (for each vertex) B0: (1, 0, 0) B1: (0, 1, 0) B2: (0, 0, 1). Put it simply, when these values are interpolated the further any of ...


1

This is how people usually do it: Create a framebuffer 1 Render your triangle, and all glowy things to this framebuffer 1, but also things that should occlude the glowers. Make sure depth testing is on. Create another framebuffer 2 and bind this framebuffer 2. Now take framebuffers 1 texture and do a post processing effect on it, what you probably want to ...


1

Assuming that graphicsDevice, renderTarget and loader are properly set I think you are missing the apply() of the glow pass and a fullscreen quad draw. If you don't draw the fullscreen quad, the glow pixel shader cannot apply the effect since there is nothing being draw to the default render target. I think that's why nothing appears on the screen. ...


1

You can create arbitrary blur effects by first fourier transforming the image, applying the blurring and then transforming it back. This is how Futuremark's 3DMark 11 does it (Whitepaper) and possibly some other modern 3D engines as well. There is also a video of the effect here and explanation of the process. Unfortunately I didn't find any ready-made ...


1

To remove the filter you need to assign to the .filters property: miniatura.filters = []; Put that in your MOUSE_OUT handler.


1

Sure it's possible. Just convert it into a button. For your four states: Up will be just your sprite (as usual) Over will be the sprite, with a glow sprite underneath That should be it. FYI, you can put MovieClips inside; so your "glow" doesn't have to be a sprite, but it can be a pulsating glow MovieClip that contains some sort of animation. Just make ...


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