New answers tagged

1

The Vita game Uncharted Golden Abyss has a charcoal rubbing minigame, where the player has to rub their thumb across the screen to trace a pattern. The drawings are collectibles that are used to complete jigsaw puzzles. See 1:15 in this video. Playing your demo kind of feels like the charcoal rubbing mechanic. In Uncharted's case, the mechanic is kind of ...


1

The first thing you need is to devise a way that the player can fail making a good part. Without that there's virtually no way to make this interesting. The player needs more direct control on the cutting and perhaps the measuring too. If you want a gamey way to add interest, make it time-bound. I don't know about others, but a score isn't really a good ...


-1

Give a score for the performance (accuracy, or maybe maybe speed, maybe both) after a part has been cut out. A high score means a reward, a higher score means a better reward (or more of the same award). The award would be a trained monkey, which will help you cut out additional parts. Score bad, and you have to work on your own on all the parts (until the ...


0

One option would be to make certain enchantments only attachable to certain items. For example any % based attacks can only be on weapons and rings. So then you limit how many of these can appear on a whole character. Other items could add a fixed value boost rather than percentage. This inherently limits the huge percentage stacking.


3

One simple way to approach this is to say that subsequent items in the stack apply to the percentage that's left after the earlier items in the stack took their bite. So the first buff in the stack takes 25% of 100% = 25% The second buff in the stack takes 25% of the remaining 75% = 18.75% The third buff in the stack takes 25% of the remaining 56.25% = 14....


11

Almost this exact mechanic is in the Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone PC game. I found it very frustrating and quite difficult to make the mouse do what I wanted. My suggestion is, make this part of the game 3D. Zoom the camera in and sit it on top of the powered Jigsaw, pointing half forwards, half down. Then get the player to use the keyboard arrow ...


27

My family is of carpenters. So, that is my bias. However, if you want challenge, hear me out. The first thing that bugs me is that you start cutting in the middle of the board. You would want to drill a hole first. Which brings me to a few ideas: Give the player tools. In fact, unlocking tools can be a reward, and thus extrinsic incentive. Let the player ...


2

A balanced approach could be some in-game mechanism that lets the player know the event is happening. e.g. An item that tells the player if a pack of creatures are spawning or perhaps a change in lighting or music. This would allow for the player to receive the information without breaking immersion.


0

Announcing events has two purposes, and both boil down to giving the player the information they need when they need it. One is to explain to the player what is going on. Rimworld, for example, is a game which lacks the visual language to tell the player that the block of rock which suddenly appeared on the map was a meteorite impact, or whether the group of ...


2

Make it windy when you get to a certain height. You could either make it so they tumble and then are blown back down, thus making a "return to battlefield" without it ruining the immersion, or just have it make the flying uncontrollable and annoying so the player goes down of his own accord. You could also possibly use rain for parts of the game. ...


8

Birds Real insects that fly too high / too far from the grass expose themselves to predators. You can make predation by birds be a risk during extended flight, without making it a hard wall - a gamble where players can decide just how far to push their luck, like Icarus courting the Sun... For example, you could have invisible volumes in your map, or ...


2

Here is a demo that accomplishes what you are asking. First, the set up -- the scene consists of a player sprite and 3 enemy sprites. The enemy sprites are assigned to the Enemy Layer. Each has a Collider2D component. The Player sprite is similar, but it also has a custom component attached and of course is not assigned to the Enemy layer. On to the ...


0

Those older games probably did use grids and standard A* but maybe with additional optimisations such as jump search A* or simply tweaking the heuristic. There's also basic techniques that can be applied like staggering path requests across several frames or grouping path requests for groups of units. More modern rts games like Starcraft2 may use navmesh or ...


1

In your StartPower function you are just looping the list of powerups so when you call SwitchPower and Destroy it will affect all elements in the list. The reason you are seeing an effect only for last power up is that it is the last one in the list. You should change your StartPower function to take a type of powerup as parameter (like StartPower(PowersList ...


1

If I was implementing something like this I would probably use inheritance. I would have a base class Power that contains all the methods you need and virtual methods for applying the power. Each powerup could then be its own class that overrides the virtual apply power method and the rest of the powerup is managed by your base class.


Top 50 recent answers are included