82

Having the player play against their own earlier accomplishments actually seems like a viable approach to implement dynamic difficulty. The better the player, the more challenging the game will become. But when the player becomes aware of this mechanic (and you have to assume they will find out about this before playing - because it's an unique mechanic and ...


41

I think you need to consider this at a more fundamental level: what is the gameplay purpose of having a health system in your game? A conventional health system serves two purposes: (1) it gives a staged failure state to combat, and (2) it serves to create long term resource management with health between fights. You say you want your game to be ...


39

Well, in a roguelike or something, where eventually if you don't use your consumables they expire (because you die, or win), then consumables provide another layer of medium- to long-term strategic planning for the players to think about. Instead of just making sure you use your renewable resources effectively in each encounter, you now can also consider ...


28

Are your test player having trouble discovering the controls or using them? If they have trouble discovering them, you can add a prompt that explains them. To make it unobtrusive for players that don't need it, you can have it appear if the player stays there doing nothing. Which, brings me to the next thing: probably all your game needs is a practice/...


27

Consumables can be a way for your player to pass difficulty spikes in your game. Common game design wisdom is to create a gradually increasing difficulty curve. But when your game is complex and its pacing more driven by narrative than gameplay concerns, then this is easier said than done. So you will often end up with situations which are suddenly far ...


25

The reason turtling is attractive in this case is because there's no or little incentive to do anything risky during the character's downtime. It's not risk-reward, it's wait-reward. To counter this, you have to incentivize risk. The periods of burst should be buffered with active preparation for their next explosive turn. There's plenty of ways to do this, ...


23

There are some games which pulled off the "silent tutorial" thing pretty well. The basic rules are: Introduce game elements one at a time Introduce them with as little distraction as possible Introduce them in a way that it is impossible or at least very difficult for the player to not do what they are supposed to do and discover the mechanic on their own. ...


19

1. Reward the player throughout the game for building (and later fighting) a strong villain. Depending on the genre, playstyle and target demographic, that might be "just" a higher score or mechanical rewards like more experience points/better loot etc. to smooth out the difficulty curve a little. Typically, games that allow you to (knowingly) affect the ...


19

In addition to what Foxwarrior said, consumables are a perfect way to include effects that would break your game if they were available all the time. Imagine you make a game level that is exactly balanced with your player abilities, and then some player gains an unlimited healing capability. The balance is right out the window, the level will be too easy, ...


15

In some genres (specially MMORPGs), consumables are used as Money Sinks. They prevent inflation and prevent money to become useless once you have acquired everything buyable that's not consumable.


12

Keep the abilities, not the power level Let players control the direction in which the character evolves, but keep control of how powerful it is when the players eventually face it. This lets them customize the final battle to their hearts content, but prevents them from gaming the system, and allows you to add a few surprises where you can make things ...


12

You mentioned having thought about auto-regeneration and your issue with that was the possibility of a player, while in the middle of a fight, running around while they auto-regenerate health. Have you considered auto-regeneration only when not-in-combat (aka out-of-combat)? This is an approach taken in many games. You could combine this with one or more ...


8

Pacing One standard rule not just of game design but of any form of entertainment is to aim for an engagement curve which slowly builds up excitement and then relieves the tension at the peak point. Game designers usually aim for that curve not just in their overall narrative, but also in smaller events, down to the most basic game loops. When you ...


7

Perhaps you can add some non-conventional healing system. Like for example : Health steal -> percentage of health gained = percentage of enemy health lost, and varies with enemy level. Every nth hit -> every nth hit gains certain health with certain weapon/class/etc. Implement the common methods -> but minimal like 1-5% Think something like these, maybe ?


7

Your problem isn't in finding the magic numbers or magic formula that makes your game feel "good" Your problem is that you haven't adequately defined what "good" is in your game. (In your question, at least) Different games will use wildly different health & damage numbers and progression curves, because they're targeting different ideas of what the ...


7

Although I like the other answers, I think nobody mentioned the most important: It all depends on your target audience. Do you target people who are gamers? They play games regularly and your game would be familiar to them? Then most likely you wouldn't need anything more than a simple screen hidden behind a button that explains the basics. (Just in case ...


6

There's lots of examples out there in 2D platforming, it's really a question of how you want healing to be "interesting"? I would agree with suggestions that "skillful" play should be rewarded, but also give the player enough opportunities to use resources and play strategically. A few thoughts: DeadCells uses a "flask" system where you fill up between ...


5

If the game is an RPG, one possible way to deal with this would be to make it a moral action. First, display things like the enemies being morally innocent, or displaying themes of bloodthirst and war being punished. For example, if you grind too much in certain areas, show the civilisations of the enemies you're grinding against start to wither, or cause ...


5

Use ability every N minutes of real time Since it is a turn-based game, the player can just wait for the ability to be available again. Use ability once or N times per day (sleep to restore, or wait out day-night cycle) This works well in the The Elder Scrolls serie because you cannot rest if ennemies are nearby. Meaning, if you are in a dungeon for ...


4

You basically want to achieve two things: 1.) You want to make the player experience the story. This is very easy to solve, don't let them skip story parts and you'll be certain they've seen it all. 2.) Don't make the player sit through unnecessary cutscenes if they don't want to. There's an easy solution to this too: make every cutscene skippable. These ...


4

Limit healing resources and put any additional resources into new, unexplored areas. Create the incentive where if a player wants to heal, they have to press on into more of the map. You can do this a few ways: Have physical healing locations on the map, but cap the health they restore. Many games (like Metroid) have healing rooms, but they provide ...


4

If cowarding during a boss fight is your major problem with auto-regeneration, make the auto-regeneration non-linear: give it a cap of auto-regeneration, and disable it during boss fight (boss fight only, not normal combat). During normal exploration, make the auto-regeneration fast when your player is in low HP, and it gradually gets slower when HP ...


4

My stance is there aren't inherently bad mechanics. Different mechanics appeal to different people. However, it sounds like that particular set of play testing might have found a disconnect between this particular mechanic & your particular game. Here are some options: The play testers are not the intended audience. The good news is this lets you keep ...


4

Consumables can be used as a push-your-luck or risk-reward mechanic. Does the player want to use them now? Or is it better to wait until later? in Foxwarrior example the player gets the consumables at a certain rate and don't want to use them any faster, because if they run out, the player could find themselves in a dire situation. That is a risk to be ...


4

I simplified your code but the math is the same, hope it helps you: using System.Collections.Generic; using UnityEngine; public class SineWaveGenerator : MonoBehaviour { public Transform A; public Transform B; public int Resolution = 50; public Material material; public float WaveScale = 1f; Camera cam; private void Start() { ...


4

At a high level, autonomous control for other party members seems like the best path forward to preserve the "action" aspect of an "action RPG." You could consider a game where the NPCs don't engage in combat at all by default, leaving it entirely to the player-controlled character. That does seem like it might limit the types of characters you could write ...


4

Let's look at your particular suggestion for a formula and what range of values it is able to handle: attack_speed = 1.8 - (1.8 * (x / 100)) What if x is larger than 100? Now you have a negative attack speed. What is that even supposed to mean mechanics-wise? Adding a 1 when calculating a divisor ensures that the division will always reduce the value ...


4

To answer your question succinctly, RYB (red, yellow, blue) would be most intuitive and closest to mixing physical colors, aka pigments, which blend subtractively. To understand the mixing behavior of RYB color-space, see both the color wheel diagram in the question, as well as the color tree below. For your use case it seems to me it would be simplest to ...


3

Limit or extend the hero's potential relative to the villain Make it so you essentially can't truly max your hero unless you first max your villain. The straightforward but boring way to do this would be to set a level cap at the start of the second half of the game relative to the level you reached as the villain, which would itself be capped at half of ...


3

Make it spoiler-proof If the game becomes popular, any secrets will be spoiled, so don't make it depend on secrets being kept from the player for it to be fun. Dr. Jekyll, meet Mr. Hyde Give the main character some trait that allows them to be both superhero and villain at the same time without realizing it, though somehow with two separate but ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible