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1

Let's say you have two ordered lists of nodes that connect two rings. For this example: list1 is the more inner ring with nodes a b d c list2 is the more outer ring with nodes Q R S T I'm going to refer to the nodes & edges between rings as 'spoke nodes & edges' and I'm going to assume that they line up in a one to one fashion. That means there ...


1

There is a python-library called Lea that is made for doing calculations like that (or "working with discrete probability distributions in an intuitive way. It allows you to model a broad range of random phenomenons, like dice throwing, coin tossing, gambling, weather, finance, etc. More generally, Lea may be used for any finite set of discrete values ...


4

This is sort of an open-ended question, but I will try to offer you some guidance on where to begin. When I try and think it through all I get is a massive set of 'if' statements Yes, not ideal. What I think you want here are weighted values between 0.0-1.0, weighted and combined through multiplication to a result in the 0.0-1.0 range. This is a way to ...


2

I would first model this by creating a table which includes the taste components (and perhaps far more data) of each ingredient per unit. This table could look something like this: Ingredient | Salt | Fat | Acid | Crunch | Umami | -------------------------------------------------------- Bacon | 5 | 6 | 3 | 7 | 8 | Lettuce ...


1

A common way to solve this is to have an invisible "kill box" or "kill plane" near the bottom of your screen. If the player falls low enough to touch it, you know they missed a jump by so much that they can't recover, and it's time to count a failure. This can take two common forms: It can be a "trigger" collision object, that'...


2

I noticed that Oskar Stålberg's games like Bad North and Townscaper flirt with this ambiguity in the way they distort and disguise the tile grid to make the world feel more organic. To solve the UX problem this could cause, they overlay an affordance that highlights the tile to be selected, or all tiles when a move is about to be issued. This gives the ...


11

The accessibility issue is really only a problem when the input for leaving the game over screen is different form the input required to play the game. For example, when the player is unable to operate more than 3 buttons comfortably, and your actual game only uses 3 buttons, then they can play it just fine. But when you then ask for a 4th button to leave ...


1

It depends as well on your type of the game. For some games the game over screen gives you an overview of what you achieved, your progress, maybe even an option of retry current level, going back to level selection or main menu. This still holds true for simple games. Another factor is that your game over screen can function as a break to reset your ...


3

As @BernhardBarker stated If you have difficulty pushing buttons, you may have difficulty playing most games. I would go with the approach that matches your whole game controls. If you control your game using buttons, wait for button press. If you control game using voice commands, use voice commands for continuing. If your game has high contrast and big ...


0

If this is a project that other people will eventually work on, there's a good reason to create individual assets in Blender but assemble the scene in Unity: this is likely to make the project more accessible for other developers who have Unity experience but not Blender experience. The Unity Editor is targeted at game designers, level designers, and ...


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