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23

There are two main benefits: First, if you downsample by more than a factor of two, some pixels in the original image will have no impact on the result image. Using GL_LINEAR, each destination pixel will only sample from at most 4 pixels from the source image; the other pixels simply get discarded. By downsampling by a factor of two, you ensure that each ...


3

0.) Setup Since the Release of Unity 5, Bloom (and quite a few other Image effects eg Ambient Occlusion, Blur, Color Correction etc) have also become available to Personal (Non-Pro/Non-Paid) Users. To start you need to import the Effects Package into your project: Assets -> Import Package -> Effects Once you've imported this package you will see ...


3

As Trevor mentioned in his comment, your only option might be to reduce the size of your kernel or to perform further downsampling . But did you thoroughly read the tutorial you've linked to? There's a tip about exploiting hardware filtering, that the author calls the "sneaky" version. It's probably the best trick you can use to optimize you bloom effect ...


2

Bit late, but here is how you do it with emission/HDR. Just use one camera that renders everything. Make sure "Allow HDR" is checked. Add a post-processing profile with bloom enabled, and set the bloom threshold to 1. This prevents anything non-HDR from getting bloomed, so normal lighting/materials are unaffected. Then you can simply choose the models you ...


2

This is generic solution that will work even with FFP: Sort models from far to near (in the example this is just a matter of 2 planes) Set blending to additive. Render opaque outline; Render half-transparent insides; Render outlines with half-transparent fading gradient; Render glowing dots sprites on the corners.


2

Typical bloom effects are applied as a post-process to the entire rendered frame. This makes it difficult to bloom only select objects. Even windowing the bloom to a region around the lines risks blooming unrelated content that comes too close. Instead, you can try "pre-blooming" your LineRenderer content - using a wider ribbon and baking a soft surrounding ...


2

Yes, you should try implementing it the way you suggest. Another way would be to create the animated ray in an art program. Export it to a sprite sheet and just use a textured quad to display the animation where you need it. That would be very efficient.


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Bloom effect in Unity is actually a post effect which means it works after all the GameObjects have been rendered by the camera, and it can't be seperately affected. The only way you can do this is use two cameras, one for the main GameObjects and one for the background, and properly set the layer and Camera's culling mask of the cameras Check this doc for ...


2

Bloom effect filters are usually circularly symmetric or isotropic. You can't achieve your goal by solely modifying the radial shape of the filter, since it won't break the symmetry. However, to implement the desired effect, you can use e. g. the stencil buffer to mask out the region you want to remain dark. Alternatively you can create a texture of the ...


1

To render just the edges of an arbitrary polygon you could use a Solid Wireframe technique. It uses barycentric coordinates to determine which edges to draw. For example you might have a triangle whose barycentric coordinates are (for each vertex) B0: (1, 0, 0) B1: (0, 1, 0) B2: (0, 0, 1). Put it simply, when these values are interpolated the further any of ...


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