5

It wouldn't really make sense. Behavior trees have their conditionals at the leaf nodes. Those conditionals determine if the traversal will continue to the other leaf nodes in that parent, or move back up to the other parent nodes. You seem to be talking more about decision trees, where it's expected to have logic in the parent nodes. You can learn more ...


4

Firslt remember that a decision tree is not the same as a state machine. You have listed three 'states' but they are not exactly 'states', they are compositions of other actions. Because of this, I will call them 'nodes'. In the 'idle' and 'walk' nodes, make the logic poll for something to flee from after every fixed time period or step. If there is ...


4

You can do this by forcing your A* heuristic to be inadmissible. An admissible heuristic is any heuristic which is strictly less than the true shortest path length. An example of an admissible heuristic is the euclidean distance to the target. Admissible heuristics guarantee the optimal solution. So how do you garauntee a sub-optimal solution? You make ...


4

The answer you reference assumes tasks that are interruptible. As with nearly all things game development, you can always break the mould to make it work for you. It's certainly possible to make a non-interruptible flag, and set it on the tree when you're running animations and other non-interruptible tasks. When the non-interruptible flag is set, the tree ...


3

Behavior Trees are a great way to structure your behavior, but they can suffer from excessive "checking", as you point out. By design, a BT will jump to another branch in the tree if a higher priority behavior becomes available, so the implementation needs a way to check if that's the case. The easiest and safest way to do it is by polling. The BT will ...


3

In my experience, navigation should not be handled explicitly in the behavior tree. BTs are great at stateless reactive behavior, while navigation is inherently stateful: you find your path, than you follow it, check whether you should replan... If you need to handle jumps, elevators etc. thnigs get crazy and are difficult to handle in a BT. In all games I ...


3

For reference: I found a thread where somebody wants to adapt FSM behaviour into an BT as well, that contains some hints and a simple example in the first posts of how to do it. But I don't think you want to use it for things like this statue. Like you see in your given example and the graph you draw to show it: It is extremly simple to design interactions ...


2

One option is as Nathan's comment, just identify when and where the values need to be cleaned up and do it manually there. If you implement callback on the edges of a FSM rather than just the nodes, meaning chunks of code that are run on transition, then you can have a specific implementation of an edge from any of the Tree states to Idle allowing the idle ...


2

Your red path follows a pretty simple decision metric. At each intersection, first evaluate which paths can reach the goal, and eliminate any that can't - this stops the algorithm from getting stuck in dead ends. Next, evaluate which paths lead "toward" the goal (ie. the dot product of the path direction with a vector pointing to the goal is greater than ...


1

One way to do this is with a noise function. wobblePhase += deltaTime * wobbleFrequency; wobbledPoint.x = destinationPoint.x + wobbleAmplitude * Noise(wobblePhase); wobbledPoint.y = destinationPoint.y + wobbleAmplitude * Noise(wobblePhase + DECORRELATION); You keep destinationPoint consistent, but have your unit seek toward wobbledPoint, which continues ...


1

I think that you should keep each individual "state" separate. For instance, if you have an enemy that will chase after the player if it sees the player, it will start following and running. If you had an enemy that only tails the player, it will start following, but not running. The code might look like this in pseudocode: class enemy{ private: bool ...


1

You do already return a reference to the behaviour with the getBehaviour method. You can store the reference in a variable and work with it. Personally, I wouldn't return the components from the other methods. Something like the following if a local variable is enough: YourBehaviour behaviour = actor.getBehaviour(BehaviourType); behaviour.method(); ...


1

Found an answer here. I thought a behaviour tree should start at the last running node to start computation time but that lead to the problem stated in the article. Treating Running States One common question when implementing a Behavior Tree is that: what to do in the next tick after a node returned a running state? There are two answer to it: starting the ...


1

Interrupt masks (sets) and ordering resolution by priority. Some general rules: any unhandled interrupts abort actions interrupts are handled in the order of most important to last important while they're handled, the current and less important interrupts are temporarily disabled disabling interrupts means preventing them from entering the interrupt set (...


1

The ScrollTo behaviour only moves the camera to the centre of your object. The Zoom Level of a layout can be changed via the Set Layout Scale System parameter. Example: Image is a screenshot of Camera Zoom Tutorial | "Construct 2"


1

I read about this algorithm a few years back for finding groups of units: http://lab.polygonal.de/?p=120 It's called recursive dimensional clustering and also appears in game programming gems 2, and was written by Steve Rabin from Nintendo. There are probably other algorithms but I personally haven't come across any formally described. In a nutshell, how ...


1

What if implementing the HSM with a stack of states for each entity you have in the game? public final class StateStack { private List<State> states = new List<State>(); public void PushState(State newState) { states.Add(newState); } public State PopState() { State topmostState = null; if (states.Count &...


1

Feed back the action return state I'm not quite clear on what you mean here, but I see this as fairly simple. The action returns are going to come back at some point -- on some game loop tick, during the action execution phase. You can do these as either method returns, as gamestate changes, or as both (method returns from action methods writing into global ...


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