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If world is very large, as in an MMO, use a database, whether SQL or noSQL style is up to you, but it is a lot simpler to read (with your own eyes) the output of noSQL DBs which serve JSON output natively (GraphQL, MongoDB). Database tech is designed by specialists to cope admirably with large quantities of data, i.e. in the hundreds of thousands to ...


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Sometimes you might want to store your savegame data somewhere else than on the users hard drive. You might offer a cloud save service, for example. In that case you would use SaveDataToMemory to create a savegame in a memory buffer and then send that memory buffer to a server via network. Another possible use-case could be to always keep the last savegame ...


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When your game is compiled into bytecode, then all the script files disappear and are mixed into one giant mush of instructions (gross oversimplification, but it helps to get the idea). So it rarely matters how you organize your code across files for performance or memory consumptions. What matters is what that code actually does. So when you wonder how to ...


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i think there is no exact relation between lines of code and ram usage. scripts are translated to lower level instructions in many levels and in the end those instructions are fed to the cpu based on defining that which functions ore which part of code should be run in the same time. ram is used to store data like variables in programm and stores files ...


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Scripts themselves take almost no RAM. You pretty much only have the cost of storing the CPU instructions (a few kilobytes at most, if your script is massive) and that's only once, it doesn't matter how many times the script is duplicated. For comparison, a single bitmap sprite can to take up several megabytes. It's your assets that are going to be taking ...


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Sure, using libraries other people created in your engine can save you a lot of work. But this can also cause a couple problems. You are now adding another abstraction layer (your engine API) on top of an already existing abstraction layer (the library). And the user of your engine is likely to add another abstraction layer on top of yours. A common saying ...


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