14

I don't know if there exists a set of colors that all people will be able to differentiate, whether or not they have any color-blindness. It might be a better idea to use an additional indicator alongside color. I know that the Ticket To Ride boardgame uses a symbol on each of the different color cards, so that if someone can't tell the difference between ...


13

There are different kinds of color blindness which occur in different intensities. The most frequent ones are red-green blindness and yellow-blue blindness (each indicating which two colors affected people can not tell apart). Here are different forms of color blindness and how frequently they occur in the general population. Source of these numbers is the ...


11

The accessibility issue is really only a problem when the input for leaving the game over screen is different form the input required to play the game. For example, when the player is unable to operate more than 3 buttons comfortably, and your actual game only uses 3 buttons, then they can play it just fine. But when you then ask for a 4th button to leave ...


5

There's a list of software to simulate color blindless here, on Daltonize.org. The shame is that most of the links are dead. One listed entry is Visolve, which seems to be relatively serious commercial software. If it really transforms the entire computer display colors, then that would be a perfect fit, if you're OK with paying the price. Side note: if I ...


5

I'm mainly red/green color blind. The colors I always choose when given a choice in situations like this, are: Red Blue Yellow Grey Those I can always tell apart. Color combinations I have problems with are mainly the following: Red/green Red/brown Green/brown Yellow/orange Red/orange Pink/grey Sky-blue/light grey Purple/dark blue Hope it helps :-)


4

This adds to Sean Middleditch's answer. The best you can do is to check for relative luminance contrast to distinguish each tile/shape. You can look up relative luminance of a color here (the Lum value). A good contrast distance is 30% to 40%.


4

Silhouettes. Always silhouettes. Even if you don't care about color-blindness, every distance game element needs a distinct silhouette. Not just a glyph on the element, but a distinctly visual black-and-white outline. For a game with tiles, consider non-square shapes. They can be square-ish, but have trapezoids and the like as well. Do not rely on the ...


4

A color Blind person sees as shown on the picture below. I would say that you should leave out the green or purple colors, and make sure that the difference between each colour is big. If you need the players to distinquish the tiles for their colours, I'd simply make them use different types of textures straight lines, horizontal lines, circles, crossed ...


4

Windows 10 Settings In Settings app, there is a section of "Ease of Access".In this section, in the "Color filters" tab on the left, you can "Turn on color filters". This can simulate vision of people who cannot see any color. Intel UHD Graphics Control Panel For users with Intel graphics card, in the "Color Enhancement" section of "Color Settings", by ...


3

The main question to ask is: would a player hearing this sound play differently as a result? If so, that's a strong clue that the sound is carrying relevant gameplay information. Take the example of the electrical door sound. If that sound could alert me to the fact that an enemy has just entered the room off-screen, then that could be a very important thing ...


3

As @BernhardBarker stated If you have difficulty pushing buttons, you may have difficulty playing most games. I would go with the approach that matches your whole game controls. If you control your game using buttons, wait for button press. If you control game using voice commands, use voice commands for continuing. If your game has high contrast and big ...


3

The most relevant accessibility concerns for game developers are: Color blindness. The most frequent one is red-green blindness which affects 9% of all men (it's quite rare for women but not unheard of either). See this question for more details. Other visual impairments. There are many people who have bad eyesight. These players can be accomodated by ...


3

The following is informed by my experience as someone with slight red/green colorblindness - specifically protanomaly. When choosing colors, think about differentiating colors by brightness in addition to just hue. A naive approach in choosing colors is to say "Okay, I need four colors. Let's go with primaries: red, green, blue and yellow. So that's #...


3

You can use this palette from the article Color Universal Design (CUD) - How to make figures and presentations that are friendly to Colorblind people - by Masataka Okabe and Kei Ito. Another option is to make the colors used by your game configurable in the options menu. That way everyone can figure out a set of colors which works for them.


2

In designing a game with this in mind, I have used shapes that correspond to the colors. You can think of this in terms of "suits", with the numbers being "ranks", similar to a card game. Even if someone couldn't tell red from black, they could still tell a 4 of clubs from a four of diamonds by the shapes. To make it easier for those with varying degrees of ...


2

Most colour blinds are dichromats, they can actually see some colour, but typically lack either red or green receptors. If you make a set of colours where the red and the green values are the same and the colours are clearly differentiable to you they should be so for most colour blinds as well. If you only have a few colours, different shades of grey can ...


2

Check out the Coblis color blindness simulator. Its a web app and you can jut upload an image. Also there are color blind communities such as http://www.reddit.com/r/colorblind. If you put some effort into it I'm sure you can find a real color blind person to help out.


2

Whenever I need to pick a set of colours, I use colorbrewer. Even though it is technically for maps, you can it for everything, and they let you choose between different pallets based on your preferences (like colour blindness).


1

It depends as well on your type of the game. For some games the game over screen gives you an overview of what you achieved, your progress, maybe even an option of retry current level, going back to level selection or main menu. This still holds true for simple games. Another factor is that your game over screen can function as a break to reset your ...


1

You can host the .apk anywhere online and just let the users download and install it manually. The down sides of this approach are many, for example discoverability (most people find all their applications only in Google Play) and lower level of trust (people are less likely to trust something outside of Google Play). Having said that, this approach is used ...


1

To add to the other answers, you can use a colorblindness simulator such as Color Oracle to detect problems with your color scheme. Also, while this may not be applicable to your game, Jon Blow of The Witness made sure that puzzles which depended on discerning different colors were optional.


1

There are different types of colorblindness, so you may not be able to be friendly with all of them, but the two major types are red-green and blue-yellow colorblindness. This means that these people have trouble differenciating red from green or yellow from blue. So for your game, try avoiding red AND green at the same time (same goes for yellow and blue).


1

All the information you need is here, together with examples: http://gameaccessibilityguidelines.com/ensure-no-essential-information-is-conveyed-by-a-colour-alone First port of call is to avoid relying on colour alone. Then test using a simulator for the most common types to pick up on contrast issues, e.g. red on black. If you're still unavoidably using ...


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