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3

The easy solution would be to simply give the object a BoxCollider and a Rigidbody and let the Unity physics engine figure out how it lands. But let's assume you have a good reason why you want to use your own physics and thus want to calculate it yourself. You will have to cheat here a bit, because in many situations there will be two correct solutions. ...


1

Turns out the solution to the fundamental problem is to avoid the complicated math and just use an appropriately-configured HingeJoint. When a player grabs an object, set node A to a kinematic body child node of that controller, and set node B to the object being grabbed. Set both paths to empty strings when they let go. The actual result is a little wonky, ...


0

For each object, you need to define a coordinate system at the snap point. If you only had a position and an orientation (depicted by the arrow in your images), you are leaving one degree of freedom (rotate around the arrow), and that leaves us with infinite solutions. Therefore, you need to define a complete coordinate system for the snap point. For each ...


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