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1

Here's a similar approach that you may find has better numerical stability / avoids the NaNs you're getting occasionally. I'm assuming a left-handed coordinate system since that's what I use most often, but you can flip it to a right-handed form easily enough if needed. planeRight = normalize(cross(worldUp, heading)); planeUp = cross(heading, planeRight); ...


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I got an answer from a local friend who saw these, and I've mostly implemented it. There's a few numerical instability points I need to sort out, but the gist is: Yes, there's definitely a way to explicitly calculate the angle of rotation needed. The flow of the process is as follows: start with a unit vector that represents the 'up' vector that I want to ...


3

I believe this is a based on multiple factors: First of, the concept of a Metaverse mainly makes sense in VR, of which the portable headsets have very strict polygon and material budgets. Secondly, in a Metaverse implementation most of the assets would be user created, which would make it hard to have a unified and polished look and feel. In Facebook's ...


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I had the same problem and I found a solution in the paper "Improving the Numerical Robustness of Sphere Swept Collision Detection" by Jeff Linahan, found here: https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1211/1211.0059.pdf In short, your collision response loop should have exactly three iterations: If you collide in the first iteration you do the sliding ...


2

A kuwahara shader would be a good start, with bright colors as an input. First hit resulted in this: Shader "Unlit/Oil Painting" { Properties { _MainTex("Texture", 2D) = "white" {} _Radius ("Radius", Range(0, 10)) = 0 } SubShader { Blend SrcAlpha OneMinusSrcAlpha Pass ...


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The comment on the linked question is correct. If you did ray casting/marching/tracing, you just need to shoot the rays in the desired configuration (i.e. a cylinder) - an the rest of the process would be same as usual for those techniques. So, if you are familiar with those techniques that tidbit is enough to get you started. And why why do we want those ...


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Perhaps using Vector3's ProjectOnPlane method could help you. From the docs: "Projects a vector onto a plane defined by a normal orthogonal to the plane." By providing your rigidbody's velocity and the normal direction of the hit flooring, you can project your velocity to be parallel to the floor. Take for example: Vector3 forceDirection = new ...


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