Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 7728

Game Design is the process of deciding the rules and mechanics of a game, and solving balancing problems to achieve the intended play experience. For questions about design of software code, use the Architecture or Algorithm tags instead. Likewise, questions about visual design should use Art tags.

1
vote
No, you can't make a game. My logic is this: if you could make a game, you'd be too busy making a game for you to want to waste your time by posting a question asking strangers on the i …
answered Dec 10 '12 by Trevor Powell
5
votes
I think it's important to draw a distinction between "fun" and "addiction". Slot machines are not fun, and never have been; they are skinner boxes which apply feedback according to a simple reward s …
answered Jun 14 '11 by Trevor Powell
20
votes
I have a psychology degree, and have been working as a programmer in the mainstream video game industry for the last thirteen years. For me, having the psychology degree (rather than a computer scien …
answered Aug 22 '11 by Trevor Powell
2
votes
Would you like to have collectibles in your game? If so, have them. If not, don't.
answered Mar 19 '13 by Trevor Powell
2
votes
No. There is no such generic formula. My experience in the professional game industry has been that tuning game elements (such as the density and placement of enemies) usually constitutes about 80 …
answered Feb 8 '12 by Trevor Powell
3
votes
I think this is a question that you can answer on your own, if you're honest with yourself. Imagine for a moment that you've spent more than ten years of your life creating a suite of hundreds of cha …
answered Feb 19 '12 by Trevor Powell
20
votes
This is a common area of confusion amongst both game developers and players. Like many such confusions, its root cause is sloppy thinking. Video game worlds do not, in fact, attempt to mirror realit …
answered Nov 17 '11 by Trevor Powell
5
votes
Why has this happened? This HASN'T happened. Duke Nukem 3D and Unreal Tournament (to use your examples) were creative games, both were trying lots of exciting new things, in new themes, in new w …
answered Jun 24 '14 by Trevor Powell
9
votes
When creating any item for your game (rare-single-use-only or not), you need to think carefully about what that item is really for -- why is it in the game? What purpose does it serve, and how does i …
answered May 16 '13 by Trevor Powell
11
votes
I approach games from the opposite point of view; instead of "how big should my world be?", I ask: "how small can my world be?" If your game doesn't absolutely require a particular bit of space -- i …
answered Jan 7 '12 by Trevor Powell
2
votes
Here's the easy approach, which is typically the one used for board games: Write a heuristic which is able to determine how good a position one side is in. Think of it as estimating "from this posit …
answered Aug 20 '16 by Trevor Powell
4
votes
Within this genre (and this is true of most other currently popular genres as well), the camera is the most important thing defining what happens in your game. A freely scrolling camera is good for s …
answered Nov 8 '12 by Trevor Powell
2
votes
Just render your interactive 2D tetris game into a texture, instead of directly to the screen. Then you can put that texture on any 3D object you want.
answered Mar 11 '18 by Trevor Powell
1
vote
There is no real "formula". The original presentation of a "Bartle Test" (as formulated by Erwin Andreasen) is to present the test-taker with a series of situations, and ask them to choose between tw …
answered Mar 13 '17 by Trevor Powell
19
votes
In terms of balance, competitive games can generally be sorted into one of three types: Positive reinforcement: When one player gains a small advantage over the other, that advantage gives that pla …
answered Jun 18 '14 by Trevor Powell

15 30 50 per page