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Currently studying Game Engineering at university and my lecturer has asked us to implement a collision manager. He asks us to use AABBvsAABB to build it, so then we can add the physics.

My question is and if anyone can answer it as simple as possible (as the notes he uses I am still lost).

What exactly is AABBvsAABB for collision detection?

Any links to sites that explain it or just some basic examples would be appreciated. EDIT: links or examples that explain it in simple terms, I can't seem to find any :(

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1 Answer 1

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An AABB is an axis-aligned bounding box. It is a box whose sides are aligned with the axes of the world, and which has extents along each axis.

By "AABBvsAABB" your instructor is trying to tell you to make an intersection test between (versus) two AABBs, finding whether they intersect, how they intersect, etc.

There are algorithms to find intersections for pretty much any combination of primitive shapes you can imagine, the one for AABB/AABB is rather straightforward, checking for each axis if the ranges from the low and high ends overlap.

+--------------------------------------+
|                                      |
|                              Y check |
|                                      |
|            +------+           +      |
|            |      |           |      |
|            |      | +---+     |  +   |
|            +------+ |   |     +  |   |
|                     |   |        |   |
|                     |   |        |   |
|                     |   |        |   |
|                     +---+        +   |
|                                      |
|                                      |
|            +------+                  |
| X check                              |
|                     +---+            |
|                                      |
+--------------------------------------+

An index of references to the methods can be found on the Realtime Rendering site.

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