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Are game engine bugs (in popular ones like Unreal and Unity, not some unknown ones) common? I know engines like Unreal, Source and Unity3D are well tested and maintained, but, for example, is there any threat like: I create a game, the engine programming is fine, so is everything I do, but I get a bug in the game because of a bug in the engine?

And as most of you guys here are game developers, has any one had such an experience? Also, can I take legal action on the creators of that engine incase I am under loss because of their bug?

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closed as too broad by Anko, bummzack, MichaelHouse Mar 18 '15 at 15:00

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ No one is going to claim their program is bug free. Unless they're completely stupid. It is why they always offer it with no warranty. \$\endgroup\$ – Alexandre Vaillancourt Mar 18 '15 at 14:53
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It can be assumed that all non-trivial software contains bugs.

  • Unreal Engine 4 has a bugtracker here.
  • Unity has a bugtracker here.

If you browse these sites you can see the many known issues with these engines.


The licensing agreements for these engines (and most software generally) will contain clauses similar to this:

No Warranty.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. UNITY AND ITS LICENSORS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT, AND ANY WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS ARISING OUT OF COURSE OF DEALING OR USAGE OF TRADE. NO ADVICE OR INFORMATION, WHETHER ORAL OR WRITTEN, OBTAINED FROM UNITY OR ELSEWHERE WILL CREATE ANY WARRANTY OR CONDITION NOT EXPRESSLY STATED IN THIS AGREEMENT.

These No Warranty / "as is" clauses are intended to reduce any liability brought against the software developers/publishers.

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I'm fairly certain that no, you cannot take legal action against the creators of software because of a bug. I'm not even sure how you get this idea, and what specifically you would sue them for.

There are known bugs (as Kelly said), and probably also unknown ones, but you have to think about the likelyhood of you even encountering these bugs, and even then you can probably work around that. In addition to that, Unreal has released their source code, so you can fix it yourself if you really have to.

The bigger question is: reliable enough compared to what? Writing an engine on your own? Unless you are The Chosen One, your homemade stuff will most likely have far more and/or serious bugs than something that has been used and tested not only longer, but by several orders of magnitude more people.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I've seen this idea come up on forums for various games; it's a somewhat common "threat" when the internet hate mob decides to descend on a game, unfortunately. \$\endgroup\$ – Maximus Minimus Mar 18 '15 at 21:20
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Hmm, you raised an actually interesting point there, but what do you actually mean by the term legal action? That does matter a lot in this case. And another thing, the creators of those engines aren't forcing you to use their engines. So it won't be possible that you can take an action on them.

The only thing that you are able to do is to report a bug to them, and ask them for a possible solution that you can take in regarding that bug. Given that you mentioned engines like UE4 and Unity, it is really unlikely (I'm not a user of those engines) that you encounter a bug that nobody has spotted before, considered the fact that there are a lot of successful titles that use those engines.

Even if you have spotted such an error or bug, the workflow is that you report the bug to them in their bug trackers. Most successful engines do have a large communities often, so it is guaranteed to be fixed unless the bug you are thinking of is not a bug actually, but is the intended behaviour.

So the conclusion is, it is mostly certain that you are not eligible to take an action on the creators of those engines.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ ​ does it mean Epic Ganes gonna write a patch for my game in case Unreals got bugs? \$\endgroup\$ – Switch Mar 18 '15 at 14:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's not that they will write a patch for your game, they will release a patch for their engine. You have to download the updated headers. \$\endgroup\$ – Sri Harsha Chilakapati Mar 18 '15 at 14:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ It means that if you've found a bug, it's actually a bug (and not just a by-design feature or something similar), and you submit it to their tracker, they will consider fixing it if it's feasible and critical enough. \$\endgroup\$ – Coburn Mar 18 '15 at 14:15

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