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I came across the following code in a game book but I can't get it, does it check if a point (left, top) in a rectangle?

bool CheckCollision(float left, float top,  float SpriteX, float SpriteWidth, float SpriteY, float SpriteHeight)
{
    return !((left >SpriteX + SpriteWidth) ||
            (top > SpriteY + SpriteHeight) ||
            (SpriteX > left + SpriteWidth) ||
            (SpriteY> top +SpriteHeight));

}
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, that's what it seems to be doing. Do you have any specific questions about how it does this? It seems really trivial to me, but on the other hand I have no idea of how much you know about C++, so I wouldn't know where to begin my explanation. \$\endgroup\$ – Philipp Feb 5 '15 at 21:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ Just a visual figure is enough. So the above function is different than Rect to Rect collision ? \$\endgroup\$ – andre Feb 5 '15 at 21:36
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I don't have enough reputation to comment, so I will post this as an answer.

To get the most out of this exercise, I suggest you take a piece of paper, draw a rectangle and then try to map out each check on the paper.

For example: if the left coordinate of my actor is bigger than the wall, it will look like so.

Hopefully you understand what I mean, it's hard to explain with words. :P

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