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I want to know what projection is used in the following game:

enter image description here

The game is Goodgame Empire.

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This is orthographic projection plain and simple. You can see this by the fact that all lines, especially the horizontal ones are perfectly parallel.

Addendum:

The comments are correct, this is isometric projection, which is a special case of the orthographic projection.

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    \$\begingroup\$ More specifically, it appears to be an isometric projection (or at least dimetric - hard to tell whether it's truly isometric or not). \$\endgroup\$ – Nathan Reed Apr 21 '14 at 20:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm pretty sure isometric and orthographic are two different projections... Are you sure? \$\endgroup\$ – Daniel Ribeiro Apr 21 '14 at 20:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Good question, that was my understanding as well, but from the wikipedia articles I cannot find anything in the definition of orthographic that undermines isometric. Is isometric really a 'child' of orthographic? Would love if someone can confirm/disprove this. \$\endgroup\$ – Roy T. Apr 21 '14 at 21:09
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    \$\begingroup\$ The difference between isometric and orthographic is that in an isometric projection each axis retains the same length in the 2D projection plane. Hence, an orthographic projection is not necessarily isometric since you can hide the Z-axis in something like depth (like in a 2D platformer). In this example, the image is most definitely orthographic, and looks isometric, but we can't be sure. \$\endgroup\$ – Mokosha Apr 21 '14 at 22:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ @DanielRibeiro Isometric and dimetric are orthographic projections in which the camera is aligned at specific angles to the world axes. This projection is definitely at least dimetric (camera is at 45 degrees to the horizontal axes), and probably isometric (camera is at 45 degrees to the vertical axis as well), though it's difficult to tell by eyeballing it. \$\endgroup\$ – Nathan Reed Apr 22 '14 at 1:46
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The diamonds of the grid measure 23 by 45. If this were isometric projection, they would be in ratio 1:sqrt(3). (That is 35.264… degrees above horizontal, not 45 as Nathan Reed suggested.) By taking arcsin(23/45), we find that this projection is 30.737… degrees above horizontal.

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