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I am not a modeller, more into the programming side. However say I wanted to create an open world type of game using U4. Is there a way to create very rough models, say of buildings, cars, trees, terrain etc, without having to fine detail them, so I can lay the skeleton of the game as a blueprint.

I know all these models would have to be redone properly but I would want to experiment creating the overall structure of the game world environment in a very rough way first.

I take it I would just be creating block(cube) like structures in say Blender, exporting these models and then loading them up in the U4 editor for placement?

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    \$\begingroup\$ The workflow for importing a high-detail model is the same as that for a low-detail model, just that you spend less effort in designing that model. Any tutorial about how to import your own models into the U4 engine would help you. \$\endgroup\$
    – Philipp
    Commented Mar 28, 2014 at 9:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ The rough models are called placeholders. They are widely used in the early state of production. ;) \$\endgroup\$ Commented Apr 15, 2014 at 20:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ What is the question? How to create boxes? \$\endgroup\$
    – AturSams
    Commented Apr 15, 2014 at 21:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why create them yourself when there's plenty of free and cheap assets? \$\endgroup\$
    – o0'.
    Commented Apr 16, 2014 at 15:48

2 Answers 2

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So what you would probably need to do is the following:

  1. Create a simple model in Blender, 3Ds Max, Maya,... whatever 3D package
  2. Export that model to .fbx (check settins if you have materials or something
  3. Take this .fbx file and drag it in the Content Browser of Unreal Engine.
  4. At this point you should fill in some data about the model, normally you only have to change the name and the package.
  5. Done. You can now drag your model from the Content Browser in your scene.

NOTE: This is based on my experience with UE3. The Content Browser part might be different with UE4 because it uses those blueprint things.

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I would not be sure in the C++ method, but using the editing view port I would recommend watching these quick tutorials for building a basic level.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8WBF4AyAX4&list=PLZlv_N0_O1gaCL2XjKluO7N2Pmmw9pvhE

He builds an office with a sliding door in like 20 minutes, along with textures, lighting, etc. So pretty sure you could piece together like an entire landscape fairly quickly using the same basic methods shown in this tutorial playlist. And it is using everything that comes with UE4, no need to import.

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