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I am asking for a specific modern opengl tutorial.

I need a tutorial that does not skip to explain any lines of code. It should also include different independent objects moving/rotating (most tutorials use only one object), as well as imported 3d objects and collision detection for them. Maybe not collision detection, but I want to see how to use OpenGL with a real project. It is important for me to know how in a good way I can combine modern opengl and a virtual environment structure.

It should also avoid stuff that won't be used. Arcysnthesis for example gives a new concept, and after teaching it, in the next tutorial, it explains how bad it is for performance and introduces another method.

Do you know any?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Warning: your question is asking for a list, thus it doesn't have a candidate for a "correct" answer, thus is conceptually inappropriate for this Q&A site. How extensive was your google research? Many possibilities are out there besides Arcsynthesis (e.g. swiftless.com/opengl4tuts.html ). Also, there are duplicate questions to look for on this very site. GL. \$\endgroup\$ – teodron Oct 22 '13 at 10:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ @teodron I can clearly say that I have been searching for a long time. I thought a fresh and more specific question would be better since similar questions are a year old and the answers there are not satisfactory for my needs. \$\endgroup\$ – Kogesho Oct 22 '13 at 12:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ Your best bet would be to check out the latest OpenGL book at your local book store. I think the OpenGL bible is at revision 6.0 now. \$\endgroup\$ – Benjamin Danger Johnson Oct 22 '13 at 14:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ P.S. I agree about the utterly useless arcsynthesis site! It helped me not one bit in learning OpenGL. Very poor format, and it comes across as if the author was more interested in the sound of his own voice, than in effective teaching. \$\endgroup\$ – Engineer Oct 25 '13 at 16:41
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I need a tutorial that does not skip to explain any lines of code. It should also include different independent objects moving/rotating (most tutorials use only one object), as well as imported 3d objects

Arcysnthesis is the best modern OpenGL tutorial I know of, using imported objects doesn't add much to the use of the API, and it's usually API agnostic. Lighthouse3D on the other hand, has some decent tutorials that use openGL 3.0+ and Assimp to import 3D objects.

But in my opinion I think you are asking for too much from a tutorial. The topics you are asking for can be covered in multiple books.

Tutorials are meant to get you started, most of what you are asking for should be learned by expanding on the tutorial code and experimenting with it for yourself, for example multiple object rendering isn't much different from rendering a single object, and most tutorials avoid it because they only want to focus on using a specific feature of the API. what I recommend is that you get OpenGL Superbible because it's really detailed and has some nice examples.

it explains how bad it is for performance and introduces another method

Introducing multiple methods/technique is what I think a good tutorial should do, as it's really essential for understanding the API and the best practices to use.

and what about collision detection for them?

Other topics like collision detection has nothing to do with rendering (at least directly) and are just too huge to be included in one tutorial with other topics. If you just Googled Collision Detection you will find a lot of topics on the subject but in my opinion non of them are good enough, because this topic varies greatly depending on the complexity and the requirements you are looking for. I advise you to get a book like Real Time Collision Detection. There is also Real Time Rendering and its companion site that covers a lot of the intersection testing and collision detection methods.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for your answer. Maybe I should have made the collision detection more clear. The reason I asked for collision detection was because I want to see how to expand a tutorial and convert it to a simple project. I should mention this in my question. \$\endgroup\$ – Kogesho Oct 22 '13 at 12:09

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