1
\$\begingroup\$

I don't think this is quite the same questions as this one but if you disagree feel free to close this :)

With SteamOS being announced yesterday I can see that it's entirely possible that opengl will get a big boost in usage in the near future. Now I already know direct3d11 quite well but I think maybe it's time to learn opengl too.

Are there any good resource for learning modern opengl that are aimed at programmers who already know direct3d11 pretty well. So don't need any education on the concepts and math, just on how to use the API and any important differences?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm not sure how you've made your question different than the other one. Further, as you can see, the other question was closed as being too broad. That's because these generate a list type questions have no correct answer and are just polls for people's favorite resource. \$\endgroup\$ – MichaelHouse Sep 24 '13 at 13:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, I hoped someone might know of a reference that listed the concepts, "Index Buffers, Vertex Buffers, Pixel Shaders" and under each one just had a quick reference to the necessary functions and that pointed out anything that was different from how they worked in direct3d. I don't really need a book or an in depth tutorial. But yeah I get that it's not that different a question. \$\endgroup\$ – JohnB Sep 24 '13 at 13:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ Maybe you should ask a question specifically about the topic you're interested in if you want a specific answer. There's no need to ask for a guide hoping your answer will be in there. Make the site your guide by asking the specific questions you want answered. \$\endgroup\$ – MichaelHouse Sep 24 '13 at 13:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ I accept this, and I'll withdraw the question shortly. It's too broad anyway. If and when I have specific questions I'll ask them \$\endgroup\$ – JohnB Sep 24 '13 at 13:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can't withdraw the question now that it has answers. This is the problem with asking known duplicate questions. It's a waste of time for the people who answered you and it dilutes and duplicates the information. \$\endgroup\$ – MichaelHouse Sep 24 '13 at 14:24
2
\$\begingroup\$

Since you already know the math and 3D programming and only want to learn the API I might say that OpenGL Superbible 5th Edition (which is the one I read) or the newer OpenGL Superbible 6th Edition might be your best bet, the books don't talk about all the deprecated features in OpenGL (which isn't the case with the red book). The book explains the "modern" API nicely, the problem though it suffers from; is that it uses its own wrapper library, especially in the introductory chapters where it hides a lot of the details, that is to be able to explain how basic math and rendering work for beginners without dealing with a lot of the openGL details. I read the 5th edition book to upgrade from openGL 2 to OpenGL 3, and I didn't find this a problem, so I would say if you are not a beginner in 3D programming ( regardless of your background ) it will be "enough" to get started.

[Edit] Based on comments, the books cover the different kinds of buffer objects including but not limited to Vertex Buffer Objects(VBO), Pixel Buffer(PBO), Frame Buffer Objects(FBO) and Texture Buffer Objects(TBO).

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, I'll take a look at those and see if they seem to cover what I want :) \$\endgroup\$ – JohnB Sep 24 '13 at 13:23
1
\$\begingroup\$

If you already know D3D, then it's only a matter of getting used to the API. For that, specifically these three tutorial series should cover everything you need to know. For other stuff, the official OpenGL reference pages are pretty excellent and rarely leave questions open.

|improve this answer|||||
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, I'd seem some of this already. The reference is good, but unless I know what I need to do in opengl to say create a pixel shader and set parameters to it, it's hard to know what to look up. The articles are useful :) \$\endgroup\$ – JohnB Sep 24 '13 at 13:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.