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Are there any web-based interactive fiction engine that allow you to script a game and have it run from a website?

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Inform and TADS are the weapons of choice for most experienced IF authors. Quest seems to be catching up in terms of functionality. ChoiceScript is perfect for simple choice-based games, but hard to extend beyond that. Undum (and its popular extension Vorple) is based on JavaScript and probably offers the easiest way to get your game into a browser. It creates nice-looking stories and can be extended quite easily. (I once implemented a World of Darkness RPG system on top of it.)

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    \$\begingroup\$ I would never recommend ChoiceScript today, I feel like Twine covers exactly the same design/usability space but is entirely superior. Otherwise a good list. \$\endgroup\$ – user744 Sep 3 '12 at 18:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ If anyone's wavering over going to either Inform or TADS, I would strongly suggest Inform. Take a look at how the games are set up in Parchment - it's as simple as adding the URL where the gamefile (.z5/.z8) is hosted to Parchment's own URL. I don't know how the whole thing looks on a mobile device, but I haven't seen anything that beats that simplicity of making a game "go online." \$\endgroup\$ – Isxek Jun 29 '13 at 3:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ To be clear, TADS 3 has something in the works that will allow authors to get their games playable on the web, but from what I've seen in the forums, it involves a bit of setup. If you're good with that, you can go with TADS 3 if you want to. \$\endgroup\$ – Isxek Jun 29 '13 at 3:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ From link to blog post about TADS: ".t3 program actually runs on the server and communicates with the browser via AJAX, rather than running entirely inside the browser as javascript the way Parchment does." With this Inform definitely wins. With inform you can create a game and host on something like neocities completely for free, without any need for any kind of server setup. \$\endgroup\$ – wha7ever Jan 24 at 16:15
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One system that I've used, and it comes to my mind recently as someone wrote a game using it for the last Ludum Dare, is Twine. Quite easy to use, and gives a fun view of how your web pages connect! Easy deployment as well, it will make html files and you just put them up on your website!

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I made a text adventure engine myself because I wanted something very minimal and that didn't require hosting.

It's called gist-txt.

It's very easy to use: you just need to create a new GitHub Gist with at least an index.markdown file in it. Then go to the URL http://potomak.github.io/gist-txt#<your-gist-id> to play your text adventure.

You can see an example text adventure at http://potomak.github.io/gist-txt/#acebd8fe14942fab4e8e.

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I wrote the advenjure engine as a project to learn Clojure and then ported it to ClojureScript so it can also target the browser.

You can see it working online here.

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