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I'm trying to make a camera like scooby-doo game.

Example: https://youtu.be/mkxm7-uw_uc?si=VpywD2wHJGAChw9N&t=238

It seems to be a 3rd person camera but its not always attached to the player. Its avoiding obstacles and sometimes it stays in same place.

It seems to be a tracked dolly cam but sometimes move forward and backward like a 3rd person cam.

I'm confused on how to make a camera like this. Tried 3rd person and Tracked Dolly but no success.

Is there any other kind of camera? Is it a mix of multiple cameras?

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    \$\begingroup\$ You might be intrested in CinemachinePath. It keeps the camera on the preset track. You can then use CinemachineFollowZoom to dynamically change the fov based on the distance from the camera to the target so that the target is always the right size on the screen. \$\endgroup\$
    – Mangata
    Commented May 9 at 16:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Mangata The camera in the video is usually not on a preset track. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kevin
    Commented May 9 at 23:47

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In the example video you've linked to, the camera motion is not limited to a specific type of motion such as "Tracked Dolly". The levels are broken into zones, with different camera movement settings for each zone.

For example, at the beginning of stage 1, the camera is typically a follow camera which tries to maintain a relative offset from the player. As the player moves into different areas, the offset changes, which may cause the camera to (for example) move lower or higher, or closer/further away. A little further into the level, we start to see some zones where the camera is either fixed in place or weighted towards a particular position (sort of like the camera is on a stretchy leash that pulls it towards a particular point).

It looks like the camera motion is smoothly interpolated when the player moves between different zones. For example, if Zone A has a high follow camera and Zone B has a low follow camera, the camera will smoothly move from high to low when the player moves from Zone A to Zone B.

In Unity, you can achieve a similar camera system with Cinemachine Brain. Brain lets you create different "virtual cameras" throughout the scene, each with their own motion settings. Brain can then smoothly blend between these camera settings as you move into different areas of the scene.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for great explanation. I was wondering if that is a single camera or multiple ones on different zones. That makes a lot of senses! \$\endgroup\$
    – anderlaini
    Commented May 10 at 11:50

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